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Opinion

  • Appreciative of Sparks

    I met JD Sparks on Oldham County Day several years ago when he offered to carry my fold up lawn chairs, without their cover, which is difficult, about two blocks from my van to the Oldham County Republican Women’s Club booth and also carried them back at the end of the day. JD Sparks has always volunteered to help all year-round with projects that benefit the community, the Republican Party and many other groups, such as the veterans.

  • Last Sunday we lifted up our prayer requests and celebrations. There were a lot of prayers for people whose loved ones had died or were dying. There were a couple of 40-something parents who were dying of cancer. We prayed for them and their children. There was the infant who died in a tragic accident. She was the only child her older parents were able to have.

  • Millions of folks struggle with the problem of inadequate self-care – not taking very good care of ourselves. We know the things we should do but we just don’t do them. There is a huge gap between what we know and what we do.

    We must practice the power of positive doing. We’ve all heard of the power of positive thinking. My goal is to take the next step and get into action no matter what. By taking action, you will move yourself from the back of the bus up to the front to the driver’s seat where you belong.

  • I am not fond of clichés, but the older I get, the more I understand the value of stepping outside the comfort zone and broadening your horizons. We often leave this to the young with admonitions off: go to college, discover yourself before you get married and travel before you have kids.

  • Cookout warning

    Folks setting to break out their outdoor grill soon face a deadly choice of inflicting food poisoning or cancer on their family and friends.

    Food poisoning by E. coli and Salmonella bacteria, if they undercook their meat. Cancer – if they heat their meat to the point of creating cancer-causing compounds.

  • It is said that Christians are being martyred for their faith more frequently than ever before in human history. All over the world, in countries run by kings, tyrants and dictators, it is dangerous to be a Christian. It is common for family members to turn their own children or spouse into the religious police for discipline when they find out that he or she has become a Christian.

  • I love words and catchy phrases. I especially like the following letter from a man named Robert Pirosh applying for a job requiring verbal skills.

  • We were looking through pictures taken at a writer’s conference I recently attended.

    “She has really nice hair,” hubby remarked about my friend Jill.

    “Isn’t it gorgeous?” I responded. “It’s like pure, black silk. She said her mom is Native American.”

    “What tribe?” he asked.

    I gave him my best “are you serious?” look. Only a boy who has grown up on a reservation would even think to ask that question.

  • Thank you to Baptist Health

    My husband was admitted to Baptist Hospital Northeast in La Grange on Dec. 10, 2013 for congestive heart failure. He spent six days in the hospital. I’m writing this letter to let you know how wonderful we were treated during his stay.

    The doctors, nurses, aides, lab and x-ray technicians and cafeteria staff were outstanding. They were friendly, courteous, knowledgeable and acted in a professional manner at all times. The dietician spent a lot of time with me, planning a future diet for my husband.

  • In general, I’m totally against sexist statements and forcing people into stereotypical gender roles. But every now and then, I succumb to this antiquated way of thinking.

    Recently, we went to our trusty salesman at the Ford dealership and told him we were in the market for a pickup truck. While he was checking inventory, hubby got to looking around the showroom. He was especially drawn to a somewhat sissified version of an SUV. The color he fancied was burnt orange.

  • I recently listed all of my values. I was surprised by the number of them. I would encourage you to write down all the values you hold dear. Then select the five most important values from the list. See how your list compares with mine.

  • Five days from now, registered voters in this county will have a chance to exercise one of their most important rights, the right to vote.

    And every year about this time, newspapers across the county feature editorials, columns, etc., preaching on why you should go vote. You can probably count this column as one of those as well.

    But in a county like Oldham, consistently ranked as one of the most wealthy, most healthy and best educated, voting should be a foregone conclusion.

  • People run for different reasons: to lose weight, to relieve stress, to compete. Last month, some 36,000 runners ran for all those reasons, plus one: to show America’s oldest marathon could not be stopped by an act of terrorism.

    The courage of those 264 people who were injured, many of them losing their own ability to walk or run, not to mention the courage of those who died, certainly added to the inspiration each Boston Marathon runner felt this year.

  • One of the powerful scriptures that people like to quote is from Romans 8:28. It reads, “…We know that in all things God works for the good.” Like the Bible verse that says, “God never gives you more than you can handle,” these verses comfort people in times of challenge. The problem is one is incomplete and the other is not in the Bible, and neither, as they are printed, are true.

  • We all need to become more comfortable with exploring our inner world. Persons who have never learned to feel comfortable in their internal world become hamstrung in managing their lives. They may sell out and give over their personhood to some influential person or group of persons. They give up on being who they truly are.

    Paying attention to your internal world is vital to your attainment of soul-satisfying contentment. I want to give you a plan for increasing your internal awareness. Here are five specific suggestions for achieving greater internal awareness.

  • I recently had lunch with a friend who shared concerns about his daughter’s school struggles. “Why are junior high girls so mean? Seventh grade is like introductory level petty.”

  • Sign defacing

    It’s election time and political signs are being installed around the county and . . . the jerks are back. Who are these creeps? They are the ones who deface, pull-out and steal the signs.

    While having personally experienced the hoodlums in the past, it was disappointing to have seen two of Judge-Executive Voegele’s signs defaced. Since the vandals sneak around in darkness, like thieves in the night, only the result of their actions are seen.

  • In James 5:16 we read, “The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective.” As Christians we are to desire righteousness, that is, we are to live lives as holy as we can. We recognize we will never be free from sin, but we make no excuses. The more we are able to do this the more powerful and effective our prayers will be. I want powerful and effective prayers. What about you?

  • Ed. note: These endorsements reflect the views of Mike DiGiuro. They are not the views or endorsements of the Oldham Era or its staff.

    One of the best things about being an “opinionist” is that I get to tell people what I think. On the other hand, it’s easy to offer an opinion, and I appreciate that even the most abject failure in a campaign for public office is more courageous than I. That being said, here are my thoughts on the primary election coming up on May 20. My conclusions are based on conversations and responses from most of the candidates.