.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  •  Oldham officials plan to spend $49,200 to renew a contract with One Call Now, a county-wide emergency notification service activated by laptop computer that can reach thousands of households by telephone in a matter of minutes to deliver a recorded message. 

    When we first heard plans for the service back in 2008, we never expected One Call Now meant we’d receive just one emergency phone call in a calendar year.

    And what an eventful year it has been. 

  • Time to abolish the La Grange Historic District

    To the editor:

    The confusion about the new parks department sign in front of city hall honoring the late James Beaumont has brought into sharp focus the question of whether to dissolve or radically change the mission and authority of the La Grange Historic District.  

  • ’ve spent the past two Memorial Days the same way. Both years, I’ve headed to La Grange to attend – and photograph – the county’s annual Memorial Day service, honoring those who have fought and continue to fight for our freedom in the armed forces.

    I’ve listened as the names are read of the soldiers who have lost their lives fighting in our country’s wars. I’ve watched as veterans stand to salute the flag as the Oldham County Community Band plays a medley of each song representing the armed forces.

  • Editor’s note: The following letters are written by students in Ryan Rembold’s class at Crestwood Elementary School. We encourage submissions from people of all ages. Send letters to: news@oldhamera.com   Cell phones for students would be used for emergencies   To the editor, My name is Taby. I’m in fifth grade at Crestwood Elementary.

  • Not all dogs are safe, friendly   To the editor: This letter is in support of the La Grange Post Master Donna Brown and her excellent letter regarding dog bites. I would like to add to her information by encouraging residents to notify Oldham County Animal Control of problem dogs before there is a bite. This agency tries to work with dog owners to educate them as to correct and acceptable methods of dog training. Once a dog has bitten we are all faced with serious decisions.

  • Teachers are thrown under the bus

  • Beaumont family grateful for support

  • Foreclosures should be counted in PVA’s assessments   To the editor: In an article in the Courier-Journal dated April 11, we learn that the Jefferson County PVA has lowered assessments on more than 26,000 homes, citing widespread foreclosures and depressed housing prices. The Jefferson County PVA went on to cite a lack of home sales in the open market meant that new assessments were based largely on the price of homes sold in foreclosure.

  •  Let’s dig up a painful memory for us Wildcat faithful.

  •  “We’re adults. When did that happen, and how do we make it stop?”

  • Westport resident is battling pancreatic cancer

  •  As health care costs and uninsured rates continue to rise, it has become increasingly important that Kentucky residents and providers do everything possible to ensure our youngest residents receive health care, regardless of their income status. 

  • To the editor:

  • A new Gallup poll claims the people of eastern Kentucky are among the most unhappy to be found anywhere. Jim McGuire may be one of the first people to dispute that finding, based on his experiences in Sandy Hook this basketball season. The retired Army man has rarely seen a non-smiling face in that isolated mountain community since starting a routine that may be unequaled in the history of Kentucky high school sports. With absolutely no ties other than a love of the game, the man locals call Jimbo has made the 254-mile roundtrip from his Garrard Coun

  • The General Assembly closed the final full week of session with a strong bipartisan effort giving final passage to both Senate Bill 1, regarding education reform, and House Bill 330, Kentucky’s $3.7 billion road plan. After several years of discussion and compromise, the Senate and the House of Representatives agreed on completely revamping Kentucky’s educational assessment process.   The biggest change will replace CATS with a combination standards-based and norm-referenced test by the 2011-2012 school year.

  •  I’m Kevin Eldridge, chairman of your Storm Water Management Board – an unpaid, volunteer position. I was formerly chairman of Planning and Zoning, a job I probably should have kept since it only made 50 percent of the people mad in any given month. 

  • Developers, not residents, should pay utility fee

  • For most of us, when we leave our jobs we drive home in one of our two cars to a comfortable home. We turn on one of our many TV sets or radios and listen to news telling us just how bad the economy has become.

  •  It was a couple of years ago that then Oldham Era general manager Julie Satterly encouraged me to write my first column for the paper. 

  • Glad airport won’t come to OC

    To the editor:

    Thank you, Oldham County for voting against the airport. I was so relieved to see that this peaceable community decided to take a stand on disturbing the peace.

    After living in Louisville the better part of my life, I moved to Oldham County in 2004. The beautiful countryside, the birds, the few farms that are left were wonderful. But more importantly was the peace and serenity that seems to abide here.