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Opinion

  • As Veterans Day is upon us, we must remember that our country stands tall because of what veterans did and the values they've always stood for. Although many of our country's giants were veterans, it's important to remember that many of the veterans who pledged their lives for our freedom are quiet heroes, common folk that we know as neighbors and friends and family members.

    In my time in the state Senate, we've taken a number of steps to make sure our veterans are recognized, appreciated and get the help they deserve after the sacrifices they've made for our nation.

  • I recently saw a bumper sticker that read, "Life never seems to turn out the way you think it will, about 90 percent of the time." No kidding. Haven't we all got a story that goes with that little bumper sticker?

    For some 20 years now my goal has been to write motivational, inspirational articles that are lessons of hope.

  • Teacher is grateful for community support

    To the editor:

    To the North Oldham community, thank you for braving the cold temperatures, wind, and rain in order to make the Walk 4 Will such a tremendous success. 

    It is humbling to see such consistent and widespread support from the community for my battle against cancer.  The myriad number of students, parents, and school groups that participated really reflects the love, faith, and cohesiveness of the community that it has been my pleasure to serve over the past six years. 

  • Oldham County Schools have successfully continued our commitment to students over the past many years. Thanks to the community, the board of education, parents, teachers, administrators and the entire support staff we have moved forward improving in all areas that support ongoing excellence in both academic and extracurricular student achievement. 

  • Seeing sports fans cheering for their team or an audience clapping for a performer is a cue for me to practice enthusiasm. Looking up at the radiance of a star, I am reminded to let my enthusiasm for life shine brightly. While watching someone who obviously relishes what he or she is doing, I vow to live life with passion.

    The energy and persistence of a motivated person are truly marvelous. The work that nourishes us, the work that is a form of rapture, is magical. 

  • Contributions – It’s what my job as fundraiser for Hosparus (the non-profit community hospices of Louisville, Southern Indiana, and Central Kentucky) is all about. Contributions are the necessary element to sustain hospice care for the future, especially for our bereavement and children’s programs. My role makes me mindful of the importance of making a contribution.

  • Kids’ Fishing Derby was a success 

    To the editor:

    The La Grange Police Department hosted its fourth-annual Kids’ Fishing Derby Sept. 26 at Eagle Creek Golf Course. 

  •  ACT scores above the national level. The district and 11 of 17 schools above the state’s 2014 goal of 100 – certainly a clear signal that Oldham County students continue to demonstrate strong academic success as seen in recent national and state assessment results. 

    A brief look at two sets of recent test reports absolutely give students, parents, teachers and administrators reasons to celebrate. 

  • There’s no place like home for Rocket man

    To the editor:

    I would like to thank the Oldham County Chamber of Commerce for selecting Rocket Man Inc. as the winner in the large business category of the OCTA Awards.  

    We sincerely appreciate this recognition and are proudly displaying the award in our new offices. 

  • In my 20 years as a chaplain and as vice president of development at Hosparus, there are two important lessons I’ve learned.

    Back in the early 1990’s I was in a training session for hospice workers where I learned my first vital lesson. Each of us was given 16 index cards and asked to write on each the names of people, abilities, things and values we hold dear. In the course of our imagined life-limiting illness, we had to surrender cards or somewhat abruptly have them taken from us.

  • 1.  What kind of vegetable is sometimes referred to as “music roots” in Southern Kentucky?

    2.  Where was golfer Gary Player’s first American tour victory?

    3.  Who was the first Kentucky governor directly elected by popular vote?

    4.  In what city is the oldest continuously operating bank in Kentucky located?

    5.  What natural resource with recreational value does Kentucky rank second only to Alaska in?

    6.  Who was the first Catholic priest to live in Kentucky?

  • To the editor:

    The 10th annual Westport River Daze festival was a huge success.  We couldn’t have asked for better weather and a prettier day.  

    Friends of Westport would like to publicly thank this year’s sponsors for their support: Baptist Hospital Northeast, Farm Bureau Insurance and Tri-County Ford.  

  • Below are excerpts from former staff writer John Foster’s blog about his adventures in Peru. Foster and his wife, Lori, left the Bluegrass state Sept. 15 and traveled to Peru where they’ll spend nine months working in an orphanage. 

    Staffers of The Oldham Era were particularly moved by a photograph taken by Foster of a young boy listening to a volunteer’s iPod in a garden outside the orphanage, and the image of the boy’s toes poking through the bottom of his shoe soles. 

  • Field hockey team deserves coverage 

    To the editor:

    I’d like to take this opportunity to let your readers know, South Oldham High School has a field hockey team. This program began six years ago at the high school. 

    You may not know this because The Oldham Era, for reasons unknown, does not report any coverage in their paper for this team. 

  • Overcrowding puts quality education at risk

    To the editor:

    I‘m concerned over the direction our schools seem to be taking. I fear Oldham is just a few steps behind the Jefferson County school system. That isn’t a compliment. 

  • Villains get punished and heroes triumph in well-made plays and books. In life it’s not easy to say who’s who. Most of us are heroic sometimes and villainous other times. Our lives are an uneven mixture of triumph, reward, and hanging-in. Unjust events happen: children die, airplanes crash, rivers flood. The world contains starvation and abundance, violence and gentleness in its pattern.

  • Letters to the editor are welcome and should be 400 words or less, and must include your signature, address and phone number (for verification). Letters on local issues will take top priority; all others will be published on a first-come basis as space allows. Letters considered to be libelous will not be printed. The Era reserves the right to limit frequent writers to one per month. The Era also reserves the right to edit letters for length and accuracy. Deadline for letters is 5 p.m. Thursday. Send to: Viewpoints, The Oldham Era, P.O. Box 5, La Grange, Ky.

  • To the editor:

    To maintain the city’s quiet zone, we must install median separators at the intersection of First and Main, and either close the south side of Second Street or install crossing gates by June. 

    Mayor Carter blames the city council for its plans to close Second Street and maintain the quiet zone. The city council has only voted on a resolution regarding safety improvements at the Second Street crossing to meet CSX regulations. A decision to close Second Street can only be done by ordinance, and a second reading of that ordinance is Nov. 2. 

  • Ironman competitor grateful to La Grange

    On Aug. 30, 2009 I witnessed one of the most exciting and outrageous moments in my Ironman career. Aside from the finish chute, flying through La Grange was second to none. 

    Your community support should be the envy of cities across America. I made it a point to hold my right hand out to slap as many screaming fans as I could even at the risk of crashing at 23 mph. That was how important it was for me to show my appreciation to your community at that moment. 

  • Nearly 10 years ago it was yearbook time. Faced with the prospect of probably never seeing most of these people again, I struggled to find something meaningful to say to my friends, thinking I was gone from Oldham County forever other than occasional visits to my parents.

    But I was drawn back. Call it fate, choice, whatever. I was partly disappointed that, like George Bailey, I never made it out of my hometown; partly excited that I had the chance to be a positive force in the community I’m from.