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Opinion

  • The sight of a vibrant red or green or blue (or the color of your choice) is a cue for me to notice something beautiful in my environment. When I see a stunning sunrise or sunset, I’m reminded to cherish beautiful experiences. When I encounter someone in need, I’m reminded to cherish within me an act of generosity. The Navajo blessing “May you walk in beauty” catches the essence of this spiritual practice. Beauty is both a path you travel and what surrounds you on the path. In the splendor of the creation, we see its outer forms.

  • To the editor:   The wounds of war are not always easy to see. In addition to the physical injuries sustained in conflict, countless servicemen and women have experienced psychological symptoms directly related to their deployment.  Recent studies estimate that 300,000 men and women have returned from Iraq and Afghanistan with severe depression or post-traumatic stress. And there are 18 suicides on average each day among America’s 25 million veterans.

  • Neighbors spend snow day in service to others

    To the editor:

    What wonderful care, love, and support we have received from our neighbors on Briarhill Road during my husband’s 10-day hospital time. But the sweetest and happiest care came from six children on our street.

    They knew that my husband, Pat, would be coming home from the hospital Friday afternoon and on that cold, blustery Friday morning they rang the door bell and asked if they could shovel our driveway.

  • As I think of the final years of my parents’ lives, I note that they were characterized by a continually failing ability to remember.

    With my dad and his dementia, it was mostly short-term events and people that would not come back to him.

    With Mom suffering from late stage Alzheimer’s, she has lost almost all recall of the distant past, or a few seconds earlier.

  • To the editor:

    On Sunday night (Dec. 27) my family and I were making our way home from Hurstbourne Lane to Crestwood. Driving on the “Gene Slider” was a mess. There wasn’t one salt truck to be seen and the condition of the roads were terrible. 

    Numerous wrecks and people sliding off the road all due to icy roads that were not treated before or during a wintry mix.

    While driving down Ky. 146 heading towards Crestwood there was a sight to be seen. 

  • Every year I receive a Christmas card from a former favorite teacher who always says he hopes I’m thriving and flourishing. I always tell him that I am. For I believe that I have been blessed to have been around many folks I call my heroes for everyday living who have taught me the lesson of “thriveability.” 

  • To the editor:

    It would be an understatement for me to say this is one of the most distressed Christmas holiday seasons most of us have had to endure. Normally during this time of year people are more concerned with shopping, baking cookies, putting up decorations, taking pictures of precious moments, scheduling all the holiday festivities and spending time with friends and family. Not this year. 

  • I was required to major in philosophy during seminary. At first I resisted. But the more I understood that a philosopher is a person seeking wisdom or enlightenment, the more value I discovered in philosophy. 

    I studied and learned about Immanuel Kant, the German philosopher, who provided his three famous questions to ask when we are dealing with difficult things. The three questions that deal with our questioning of our assumptions are:

    • What can I know?

    • What should I do?

    • What may I hope?

  • To the editor:

    My Christmas wish is for Sen.  Harris to promote Kentucky Proud/Oldham County thoroughbred racing and breeding to the same extent he does our Christmas trees.

    Bill Landes, Goshen

  • Use locally-made ingredient in pecan pie

    To the editor,

    Regarding Virginia Stoess’ favorite pecan pie – the second ingredient calls for a cup of light karo syrup.

    I would suggest Bob White/White Syrup. It is manufactured right here in Buckner and is made by Oldham Countians with pride.

    Robert Bates, La Grange

    Field hockey team helps clean up roadway

    To the editor:

  • Crestwood traffic needs a better solution

    To the editor:

    As a commuter who got stuck in traffic Dec. 1 because yet another truck got stuck on the elevated railroad crossing at Railroad Avenue in Crestwood, and now routinely sits in traffic in the morning at a new four-way stop where Crestwood Elementary’s new parking lot exit joins Ky. 146 and Ky. 146 at another crossing,  it’s time to suggest to Crestwood’s city fathers and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet how to fix a growing traffic problem.  

  • Harris: Celebrate a Kentucky Proud Christmas

    To the editor:

    A month ago, there was a dust-up in Frankfort regarding what to call the evergreen tree that traditionally stands in the front of the capitol every Christmas season.  

    For most of us, this symbol of the renewal and promise of Christ’s birth is called the Christmas tree. Regrettably, in a misguided attempt to be politically correct, the governor decided to be the first Kentucky governor to call it a holiday tree.  

  • We have all heard the saying, “A picture is worth 1,000 words.” I never doubted that statement until recently. I got to thinking about what you could do with 1,000 words and I discovered that with far less than 1,000 words one could write the Lord’s Prayer, the 23rd Psalm, the Hippocratic Oath, a sonnet by Shakespeare, the preamble to the Constitution, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the Boy Scout oath. I submit to you that those 1,000 words are worth more than any picture on this earth.

  •  Ready or not, the holidays are upon us. Everywhere you look there is a flurry of activity to “get ready” for them. 

    For many, “get ready” means, shopping, cooking, cleaning and more shopping. All this activity creates a great amount of stress and a certain dread. 

    Personally, I dread the thought of crowds, traffic, rude people and in some cases, near fights over parking spaces or that last item on the shelf. 

  • Sorting clothes and wondering what happened to my other sock is my cue to practice mystery. Passing a funeral home or a cemetery, I am reminded to contemplate mysteries. 

    Whenever I hear someone apply a system of explanations for good fortune or illness, I vow to respect the complexity and mystery of life.

    I have an abiding respect for the great mysteries of life – the profound distinctiveness of other souls, the strange beauty of nature and the animal world, the complexity of our inner selves, the unfathomable depths of the Inexplicable One. 

  • Transformation usually involves the shedding of old ways, especially those that have become burdens. This practice proclaims that no matter who you are, no matter what has already happened to you, no matter what you have done, it is still possible to be and do something new.

    Watching ice melt into water is a cue for me to practice transformation. When I witness the movement from sickness to health, I vow to be happy with all the changes I have undergone. Looking at photographs of myself when I was younger, I vow to be happy with all the changes I have undergone.

  • Christian store known for personal service

    To the editor:

    For those of you who are not familiar with “The Open Door Christian Store” in Crestwood, I urge you to stop by and check it out. For years, it was necessary to drive into Jefferson County to find such a retail store, but not any longer.  

  • We children of the Internet and the cell phone and the Weather Channel think we are the enlightened ones. We aren’t fooled by anything. We just want the facts. We think we are on the right trail. 

  • Every now and then I get to use my college undergraduate degree. This may sound odd as most of us have guided our career choices to complement our educational achievements. 

  •  Lions Club, Rotary host successful community event

    To the editor,

    This past Halloween, the North Oldham Lions Club and the Prospect-Goshen Rotary Club once again partnered  to sponsor a community-wide Halloween event, which featured barbecue and homemade sides for dinner, games, prizes, treats for all, and a scary back road hayride through the park, arriving at the Haunted Forest and Enchanted Woods.