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Opinion

  • Have you ever watched a tight-rope walker? Maybe you noticed the performer carries a balance bar. Ever so carefully he moves the bar from side-to-side in order to keep his balance Now life is something like this for us. You and I are negotiating the difficult, if different, courses of our lives. 

    Life means action and action means other people. Other people mean that there will be some friction, and friction often results in stress. Some of this stress is helpful and positive. Some of it is negative and harmful. We badly need our balance bars.

  • To the editor:

    In September 2005, we started LOCAL Transit. 

    Our intent was to provide a new service that would benefit Oldham County residents. Most know we are a small, but dedicated nonprofit agency which focuses on those who use our services. 

    We do what we do because of our Christian faith and commitment.

  • What people think about determines what they are. Hawthorne tells about the boy, Ernest, who would look longingly at the great stone face on the side of the mountain. It was a strong, kind, honorable face that thrilled the heart of this boy. 

    There was a legend that some day a man would appear who would look like the great stone face. Through all his childhood, and even after he became a man, Ernest kept looking at the great face and for the man who was like it. 

  • Historic district guidelines are clear

    To the editor:

    I’m shocked at David  Voegele’s choice of adjectives when describing behavior of the La Grange Historic District Commission. (Letters to the Editor, Aug. 13 edition).

    The council meeting included an appeal of the decision by the LHDC to deny a certificate of appropriateness for a sign. 

    The historic district guidelines, available at the city of La Grange Web site, are clear.  

  •  I’m not a runner.

    I never have been. Never in my history have I been that person who wakes up before the sun for a quick morning run. Honestly, I’d prefer to never be that person who wakes up before the sun’s out at all.

  • County is fortunate to be part of Ironman

    To the editor:

    The following are comments heard during the Ironman Triathlon last year:

    “We are so glad you are open.”

    “Sometimes shops in small towns are closed during Ironman.”

    “What a charming town!”

    Gallery 104 was filled with customers the day of Ironman 2008.

    Imagine La Grange as a vacation destination for visitors from around the world.This is what we have during the Ironman competition.

  • I used to play baseball, and my Dad went to the games because he was always interested in whatever his children did. I remember one game especially. It was a tight game, and I happened to get a long hit. I was running around the bases as fast as I could, but I seemed to gain added strength when I heard him shouting above the crowd, “Come on home, Bob, come on home.”

  • There’s no place like home to find Miss OC

    To the editor:

    I wonder if most people realize our newly crowned Miss Oldham County 2009 is from Henry County. I am appalled our county is not represented by a resident who actually lives in Oldham County. 

  • Officials are chugging along to preserve quiet zone

    To the editor:

    The July La Grange City Council meeting included an uninformed statement that nothing has been done by the city in the past six years to preserve the quiet zone. 

    Involved residents and merchants know this isn’t true.

    In 2003, CSX informed city officials that along with overdue safety improvements, the city needed to address new federal regulations related to a quiet zone in the downtown historic district. 

  • The most precious things in life are done by hand.  We have marvelous washing machines for clothes and for dishes, but they have never made a machine to bathe a baby. Babies are bathed by hand.

    Someone wrote these words:

    “I almost weep when looking back

    To childhood’s distant day.

    I think how those hands rested not

    When mine were at their play.

    I’ve looked on hands whose form and hue

    A sculptor’s dream might be.

    Yet are these aged, wrinkled hands, 

    More beautiful to me.”

  • Through the years, I have received far more reward and affirmation for my work than I deserve. 

    Early one morning I got on an airplane to return home from a wonderful vacation in Hawaii. I was sleepy and tired and trying to deal with the six-hour time change.

     I just wanted to rest. 

    Sitting beside me, however, was one of those talking people, and he kept it up, until we arrived at the airport where I was to change planes to finish the trip home. 

  • Ironman athletes worth celebrating

    To the editor:

    The Ironman – an inconvenience? 

    We ought to be celebrating these athletes! What an accomplishment! Swimming, biking and running for 8 to 16 hours or more. Anybody who does that is remarkable in my book.                                     

  • Homes showcased in Homearama are touted as “green” and “conservation developments.”

    Yeah, right.

    The homes are beautiful, enviable and creative, but let’s be clear. 

    They’re not green. 

    There’s no such thing as a 7,800-square foot green home.

  • Race track slots would help state

    To the editor:

    If you asked someone what Kentucky is known for, you would most likely hear “horses and tobacco.” However, in the past few years, both have seen more than their fair share of hard times. It is almost as if our state representatives are crippling what Kentucky is known for with their decisions made in the name of saving Kentuckians from themselves. 

  • As my colleagues and I began the second week of the 2009 Extraordinary Session, we were uncertain if we’d accomplish our mission – addressing our $1 billion budget shortfall. 

    With the Senate approving one version of the budget and the House approving another, many were unsure about the bill’s fate. Yet, after only a day, the conference committee emerged from negotiations with two bills geared towards economic recovery and fiscal discipline. It was my pleasure to have been one of only three House Republicans selected to serve on the conference committee.

  • "If the community is happy, then they support your business and if your business is doing well, then you can give back more to the community."  – Magic Johnson

    I know you’ve been reading much in the news about the importance of shopping local. 

    Every day, there are more reasons for you to support your local businesses, and I would like to share a few more that may not be so obvious.

    As more and more big box stores open, more and more “mom and pop” stores have been forced out of business. 

  • One of my many passions is photography, and I enjoy taking pictures of one of my favorite places on the planet – beautiful Oldham County. 

    Last week the subject matter was subdivision entrances. 

    As I was shooting a photo of a particularly beautiful entrance, a lady walked up to me and asked me if all the hard work she had put into making sure the subdivision entrance looked nice really matters.

    My answer was a resounding, YES! 

  • OCPD Citizens’ Police Academy is invaluable

    To the editor:

    I would like to extend a big thank you to Lt. Tim Wakefield, Chief Griffin and the Oldham County Police Department for offering the Citizens’ Academy.

    This 10-week course was informative and a lot of fun. The academy was an eye-opening experience into the workings of local law enforcement. I continue to be amazed at how professional these officers act during interactions with the public.

  • Reverence is the way of radical respect. It recognizes and honors the sacred in everything – our bodies, other people, animals, rocks, the ground, and the waters. 

    “I cannot but have reverence for all that is called life. I cannot avoid compassion for everything that is called life. That is the beginning and foundation of morality.” –Albert Schweitzer

  • Living in a down economy isn’t having much effect on Harvey Conner. He still has a job – the same one he’s had for 44 years.

    And he has enough money to go out in search of some of the products he has manufactured since he was a teenager.

    “The other day, over in Nicholasville, I found a piece I made in the early 1980s and only had to give $1.25 for it,” says the 63-year-old Madison County native.

    His employer, Bybee Pottery, has been in business in the tiny community of Waco since 1809.