.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • I am leaving beautiful Berlin and will soon be home again in Indiana.

    As my visit comes to a close, I find myself wondering once more why my ancestors ever chose to leave such a place.

    Make no mistake, I love the U.S. and am proud and thankful to be an American, but three hundred years ago, things were different.  It’s hard to imagine what my grandparents were thinking when they left family, community, and traditions behind and set sail for the unknown.

  • In last week’s edition, a reporter incorrectly identified the Pewee Valley Mayor. His name is Bob Rogers, not Mike. We apologize for the error.

  •   Over 70% of adults read their community newspapers. Are you in that statistic?

    While metropolitan daily newspapers and urban television stations cover international, national and state news, along with the ocassional local story if it is sensational enough, your community newspaper focuses on the people, places and things in a very specific area.

  • I know I have some very big shoes to fill. I never knew Tony Cotten, but he did leave me an inheritance.

    Just one week into the job as publisher here at The Oldham Era, I’ve heard so many wonderful comments about Tony.

    “Tony had a big personality.”

    “Tony had a dry wit that would knock you over.”

    “Because of Tony, the dreams of my fourth-grade storyteller’s heart came true.”

  • We may be a little more than halfway through 2013, but in Washington and state governments across the country, the focus is increasingly on federal actions taken in 2011.

  • To the editor:

    I wish to address the 1929 dining car that is being placed on the tracks near the museum. I feel this is a very dangerous place to put it, as there are no crossing lights at this intersection and the trains cannot blow their whistle at the crossing.

    It was hard to see down the tracks with the engine there, and now they are adding this other car.

  • To the editor:

    The La Grange City Council on Monday, Aug. 8, passed a 1 percent compensation tax. According to the ordinance, 100 percent of the funds collected through the tax will be used to pay the city’s bond obligation on Oldham Reserve business park.

    Oldham Reserve is a 1,000-acre business development located off of Exit 22 on Interstate 71. It is home to The Rawlings Company, an 8OO-person operation; the average salary there is $63,000. From an economic development and spin-off perspective, this is equivalent to two or three medium-sized businesses.

  • Last week, on the occasion of my eldest child’s 21st birthday, I spent most of the day trying to garner compliments. 

    Perhaps “compliment” is the wrong word. It was really reassurance that I needed. I didn’t care who said it, I just wanted to hear those magical words: “My goodness, young lady! You do not look anywhere near old enough to have a 21-year-old daughter!”

  • For generations now, students have been taught that Abraham Lincoln was the first native Kentuckian to be U.S. President.

    Technically speaking, however, that’s not true.

  • To the editor:

    Project Guild of La Grange would like to send out a special thank-you to the community of Oldham County and its visitors for attending the 43rd annual Oldham County Day. 

    The Grand Marshal Luncheon, sponsored by Citizens Union Bank; the YMCA 1M and 5K races; the Dancing in the Street concerts on Friday and Saturday nights, sponsored by the city of La Grange; and the annual La Grange Rotary pancake breakfast were all successful.

  • To the editor:

    It was with some concern that I learned last week that my cancellation notice for the 2013 Annual Veterans Recognition Event had not been printed by The Oldham Era this past week or the week before.

    For several reasons, it was necessary for me to cancel this year’s event, and the newspaper had promised to publish the notice to that effect. It was my goal to inform readers that, after seven years of hosting this event on the second Thursday in August, I am unable this year to hold it.

  • At 43, it’s probably time to stop saying, “when” I become middle-aged, and accept that I’ve arrived. I don’t know what the official marker is for middle-aged, but I seriously doubt I’m going to make it to 86. 

  • We all had role models growing up. Maybe you still do.

    Who was your role model? Why did you choose the person? What qualities did he/she possess?

    Did your role model fall in your eyes over time? 

  • Mayor Greg Fischer has proclaimed Louisville to be “Compassion City.” 

    What a noble thing to do! For compassion is the unique human ability to care about other people, to be considerate of others and sensitive to their needs. 

  • Nestled inside a grocery sack filled with pint-sized cartons of shelf-stable chocolate milk, four containers of banana yogurt and other kid-friendly snacks is a book about being scared that I hope my daughter will never open without me.

    I recently shopped for supplies to keep our daughter, Harper, happy and well-fed for at least 24 hours in the event of an emergency that prevents us from reaching her preschool.

  • Are you conscious of the chatter in your mind? For the next few minutes, pay attention to it.

    Maybe you are making a grocery or “to-do” list. Perhaps you are passing judgment on the person who just walked past you at the mall and comparing how you measure up to her. Now your mind is wandering off to how you have never been good enough or smart enough or pretty enough.

  • My dad recently decided to sell the old family homestead.

    The last time I was there was right after the death of my precious grandmother. The house was to be rented, and my job was to clean it before the new tenants arrived. The task proved to be more difficult than I had imagined.

    When I was a child, I always knew grandma would be waiting for me on the front porch. As she got older, she would greet me at the door.

  • My wife, Sarah, and I moved to Oldham County nearly 10 years ago.
    Having grown up here, I knew the area quite well.
    For Sarah, the outsider, the learning curve was more precipitous.
    When needing to get somewhere in Crestwood, La Grange or Goshen, Sarah would often come to me for directions. Those conversations sometimes went like this:
    Sarah: “How do you get to (fill in the blank)?”
    Me: “Do you remember where (fill in the blank) used to be?”
    Sarah:  “No.”

  • This week, thousands of parents, teachers, volunteers and staff members who contribute to the success of students in the Oldham County district received a 1,000-word tirade from Superintendent Will Wells.

    His message? He combined criticism of the local newspaper for publishing differing opinions with yet another pat-on-the-back for the Oldham County Board of Education’s five elected officials.

  • It’s election season — and that means campaigns are making confetti out of data.
    Because no matter your argument, there’s always a statistic to back it up.
    Take, for instance, elections for the Oldham County Board of Education — a pivotal race that could drastically alter the course of Oldham County Schools.
    Numbers have been flying around like monkeys in the Wizard of Oz.
    During a candidate forum Sept. 25, Division 3 candidate Gary Gibson cited a number of statistics that have been fact-checked since the forum.