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Features

  • For most young girls, the first day of high school might be considered a milestone moment. Sarah Camp missed the entire first week of high school, but what the 15-year-old from Crestwood experienced instead was “life-changing.”

    “It was amazing,” Camp said. “It’s an experience I’ll never forget.”

  • Georgia is a long way to go for a bra fitting, especially if you’re a goat.

    But that’s exactly where Betty, an “extremely well-endowed” Myotonic goat, traveled to get a little special attention from Cynthia and Molly of Lifetime’s reality show “Double Divas.”

    The premise of the show is that the owners design and create custom lingerie, especially bras, for clients with special needs. Betty certainly has special needs.

  • Lynn Tincher started her first novel 16 times.

    It eventually turned into the first novel in a series of three, with a fourth in the works. And now, the book that took 16 tries to get written is slated to be made into a TV pilot.

    The psychological thriller Afterthoughts has been picked up by Tilted Pictures of Los Angeles for the filming of a pilot episode in 2014.

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  • An error during the Little Miss and Mister Oldham County Fair pageant resulted in the wrong name being called as winner of the Little Miss crown. Brooke Davis, left, with Little Mister Will Alecia will represent Oldham County this month at the Kentucky State Fair. Davis was the actual winner, but Alex McGill’s name was called by mistake. Alex was allowed to share the Little Miss Oldham County crown, but only Brooke will compete at state.

  • As mankind learned to grow food, the notion that we could preserve it for future use was not far off. 

    The earliest pickles were produced by salting. People discovered that salting food in urns and pots, then burying the vessels caused the production of brine. The brine added flavor and acted as a preservative. 

  • By MELISSA BLANKENSHIP
    The Oldham Era

    Laura Ross said she was deeply honored and very surprised when she opened the letter notifying her she had won a 2013 Governor’s Award in the Arts.

    “I was awestruck, really,” Ross admitted.

    Ross received the Artist Award, a lifetime achievement award that recognizes an individual’s contribution to and significant impact on the arts in Kentucky.

  • Makenzie Brooke King was crowned Miss Oldham County Fair. Other winners were Victoria McKinney, first runner-up and Most Photogenic; Samantha Graziul, second runner-up and Miss Congeniality; Emily Kunce, third runner-up; Chassidy Monroe, People’s Choice; and Kristen Rowling, Trailblazer and Rising Star.

    Denise Rowling and Eric Kunce were named Mom of the Year and Dad of the Year, respectively.

  • By Wesley Robinson
    News Intern, The Oldham Era

    Steve Harp, 54, of La Grange has been known for growing gargantuan things in his quarter-acre garden.

    A few years back, he grew a pumpkin that tipped the scales at more than 700 pounds. He said it was the 10th largest in the world for that year. Because of a stroke he had in March he’s had to scale back growing produce and was only able to grow oversized tomatoes with the help of his wife Laura.

  • By Wesley Robinson
    News intern, The Oldham Era

  • When Logan Parker chose to study cystic fibrosis for a class science project, he knew very little about the disease.

    Through his studies, the eighth-grader learned about the genetic disorder that primarily affects the lungs. The disease causes thick, bacteria-laden mucus to form and makes breathing incredibly difficult.

    Parker learned even more about cystic fibrosis when a beloved Oldham County Middle School science teacher succumbed to the disease last month.

  • The classroom is alive with activity as a handful of eighth-graders puts the finishing touches on decorations for an end-of-the-school-year field day.

    Like so many before them, the students will soon make the inevitable leap from middle school upperclassman to high school newbies.

    Joe Percefull has observed this rite of passage many times in his 16 years as a teacher at Oldham County Middle School.

  • Rick and Karen Albers celebrated with the rest of Card Nation when the U of L men’s basketball team cut down the nets in Atlanta last month.

    Little did they know, the Goshen couple would have their own small part to play in the Cardinals’ championship celebration.

    More than 270,000 people lined the streets of downtown Louisville May 2 to get a glimpse of the Pegasus Parade’s grand marshals, the U of L men’s and women’s basketball teams.

  • Crestwood’s newest residents got a first look at their new home Friday.

    James and Amanda Calton did what any new homeowners do: opened the kitchen cabinets, envisioned where furniture would go, disagreed over who would get more closet space.

    They also thanked Amanda Shaunessy over and over.

    Shaunessy is a housing case worker with Homes on the Homefront, a program organized by Operation Homefront, a national nonprofit that serves veterans and military families.

    Homes on the Homefront works with banks that donate foreclosed homes.

  • The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life will return to Oldham County this spring.

    The fundraising event will be held 7 p.m.-7 a.m., May 10-11, at the Oldham County High School football field. It is the 12th year for the event here.

  • Crestwood business owner and former contestant on “The Bachelorette” Sean Ramey has announced the publication of his newest book, “Defend Yourself (In A Zombie Apocalypse).”

    Ramey, a USA Martial Arts Hall of Fame inductee, owns Kentucky Tae Kwon Do and Fitness Academy in Crestwood.

    The new title is Ramey’s second literary effort in the past three months, coming on the heels of “Defend Yourself (No Experience Necessary).”

  • A North Oldham High School graduate featured in Monday’s episode of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” chose to walk away with thousands when stumped by a question about cajones. 

    Derek McMahan, a law student at The College of William and Mary, made it to the seventh question of the game show. 

  • Ms. Stoess' second-grade class

    Dear Santa,
    Hi Santa.  How are things up at the North Pole? How is Mrs. Claus?  How are the elves.

  • 3- and 4-year-olds

    Dear Santa, I don’t have any questions. I don’t know what I want for Christmas still. I don’t have any words to say.
    Love Ava J.

    Dear Santa, I want a toy Ariel, a toy  bath Belle and a toy Cinderella and Tiannna and new ballet shoes cause my Angelina shoes are about capoot!
    Love, Sophia R.

    Dear Santa, I want a bunny, a doggie, and a cat, a dinosaur and a hedgehog. Just toys.
    Love, Isabella T.

  • Letters from Mrs. German’s Kindergarten Class

    Dear Santa,
    This year I have been pretty good!  On my Christmas list this year is a Lalaloopsy doll, a bear, a Dora movie, and a dancing game.  Tell Rudolph hello!  
    Stephanie, 5

    Dear Santa,
    I bet you and the elves are super busy.  This year I want a Barbie, a pony, stickers, and a heart necklace.  Please bring snow for Christmas.
    Flor, 5

    Dear Santa,