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Features

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  • By Wesley Robinson

      It’s been nearly seven years since Donna Bothur donated her kidney but she’s still actively working to raise awareness to help those in need.

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    Fred Balke and Howard Griffin, both of Crestwood, remembering their day’s in WW II, while on a tour of the LST 325 while it was docked at Madison, Ind. Balke served as a See Bee in the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific, while Griffin served in the U.S. Army all over the world.

  •  On Saturday, Discover Downtown La Grange (DDL) hosted the first Antiques and Primitives on the Track. Business on Main Street held open door and sidewalk sales, while vendors set up shop along the closed roadway. The new event was well received, according to DDL Director Nancy Griffin. “The merchants and vendors were very pleased and we’ve already been asked to do it again.”

  •  Over 200 competitors from 15 states and Canada converged on the Flying Cross Horse Farm in Skylight this past weekend. Riders and horses competed in three events: dressage, stadium jumping and cross country. In its 13th year, the Horse Trials have had a waiting list for three years of hopeful competitors, who range in age from 10 to 70+.

  •  In its second year, the 2013 Hermitage Classic drew 36 competitors to its ever evolving course. Much like the events held at the Flying Cross Farm Horse Trials, riders must compete in three events: dressage, marathon and cones. The primary difference is that these course events are completed with the horse, or team of two horses, pulling a cart with a driver and sometimes a passenger. 

  •  An afterschool program that makes children wish they had classes on the weekend seems too good to be true. But that's exactly what Oldham County resident Sarah Cotten has found at All About Kids.

  • Artist Lea Ann Luce’s love of art began early, surfacing in the first grade, expanding in high school and building even further at University of Kentucky’s school of art. 

    Today, in addition to her own active work in various media, she is committed to teaching art to children, passing along the love of art that she was given as a youngster. 

  • What started out as a trip to pick up a cat has turned in to so much more for Fred and Dottie Fellows of La Grange.

    Three years ago the Fellows went to the Animal Care Society to adopt a cat after their last cat passed away.

    “We thought about not getting another one,” Fred Fellows said. “And we made it about a week before we decided it was just too lonely without a pet.”

  • When most children turn 11 they try to have an awesome party at a fun place. They might take all their friends out to Chuck E. Cheese or a video game arcade.

    Emma MacNiven decided for her birthday bash on Sept. 14, she would like to have a fundraiser and instead of presents, she wants donations.

    While this may seem like an odd choice for a girl turning 11, Emma’s life has been affected by a disorder known as Twin to Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS). The syndrome took her twin brothers back in 1989, robbing her of the chance to meet them.

  • For most young girls, the first day of high school might be considered a milestone moment. Sarah Camp missed the entire first week of high school, but what the 15-year-old from Crestwood experienced instead was “life-changing.”

    “It was amazing,” Camp said. “It’s an experience I’ll never forget.”

  • Georgia is a long way to go for a bra fitting, especially if you’re a goat.

    But that’s exactly where Betty, an “extremely well-endowed” Myotonic goat, traveled to get a little special attention from Cynthia and Molly of Lifetime’s reality show “Double Divas.”

    The premise of the show is that the owners design and create custom lingerie, especially bras, for clients with special needs. Betty certainly has special needs.

  • Lynn Tincher started her first novel 16 times.

    It eventually turned into the first novel in a series of three, with a fourth in the works. And now, the book that took 16 tries to get written is slated to be made into a TV pilot.

    The psychological thriller Afterthoughts has been picked up by Tilted Pictures of Los Angeles for the filming of a pilot episode in 2014.

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  • An error during the Little Miss and Mister Oldham County Fair pageant resulted in the wrong name being called as winner of the Little Miss crown. Brooke Davis, left, with Little Mister Will Alecia will represent Oldham County this month at the Kentucky State Fair. Davis was the actual winner, but Alex McGill’s name was called by mistake. Alex was allowed to share the Little Miss Oldham County crown, but only Brooke will compete at state.

  • As mankind learned to grow food, the notion that we could preserve it for future use was not far off. 

    The earliest pickles were produced by salting. People discovered that salting food in urns and pots, then burying the vessels caused the production of brine. The brine added flavor and acted as a preservative. 

  • By MELISSA BLANKENSHIP
    The Oldham Era

    Laura Ross said she was deeply honored and very surprised when she opened the letter notifying her she had won a 2013 Governor’s Award in the Arts.

    “I was awestruck, really,” Ross admitted.

    Ross received the Artist Award, a lifetime achievement award that recognizes an individual’s contribution to and significant impact on the arts in Kentucky.

  • Makenzie Brooke King was crowned Miss Oldham County Fair. Other winners were Victoria McKinney, first runner-up and Most Photogenic; Samantha Graziul, second runner-up and Miss Congeniality; Emily Kunce, third runner-up; Chassidy Monroe, People’s Choice; and Kristen Rowling, Trailblazer and Rising Star.

    Denise Rowling and Eric Kunce were named Mom of the Year and Dad of the Year, respectively.

  • By Wesley Robinson
    News Intern, The Oldham Era

    Steve Harp, 54, of La Grange has been known for growing gargantuan things in his quarter-acre garden.

    A few years back, he grew a pumpkin that tipped the scales at more than 700 pounds. He said it was the 10th largest in the world for that year. Because of a stroke he had in March he’s had to scale back growing produce and was only able to grow oversized tomatoes with the help of his wife Laura.