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Features

  • Jessica Bush rang in the new year with an unexpectedly early bundle of joy.

    Thomas Eugene Howard was born at 2 p.m. on Jan. 1 to Bush and Tommy Howard of Carrollton. Thomas was the first baby born in 2014 at Baptist Health La Grange. The healthy 7 pound, 8 ounce baby boy was 14 days early and measured 20 inches.

    “I’m pretty excited,” Bush said. “I’m a little nervous about having a boy.”

  • New Year’s is celebrated in America in different ways, usually with lots of friends, parties, confetti, party horns and staying up late to ring in the New Year. Visit the Oldham County History Center’s Peyton Samuel Head Museum and explore some New Year traditions celebrated around the world.

    This exhibit is geared toward children in a year-long effort to educate them about different cultures and the county in which they live.

  • Hear ye, hear ye. Be it known that “the 22nd day of January hereafter be observed as David Wark Griffith Day.”

    And so it has been since Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1975, in Oldham County when Judge Wendell Moore signed into affect a proclamation designating David Wark Griffith Day.

  • A new job is music to Amy Love’s ears.

    The Prospect resident was recently hired by St. Jude Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., to begin a music therapy program.

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    Danielle and Stephen Sauerbeck love a good scavenger hunt.

    So far, their love of such events has taken them to Chicago, Milwaukee, even Puerto Rico.

    That’s because the Sauerbeck’s participate in events similar to CBS’ The Amazing Race, which is a mix of scavenger hunts and travel, through two companies: Urban Race and Urban Dare.

  • Howls of praise will be ringing out this holiday season thanks to a local veterinary center.

    The “Joy to the Woof” program sponsored by the Pewee Valley Veterinary Center has created 25 care packages for military service dogs. In its second year, the program provides specialty gear like goggles and protective booties for the four-legged soldiers.

    “Unfortunately they are forgotten a lot of the time,” Carolyne Tilford, a veterinary technician at the center said. “They go through a lot, it’s not easy.”

  • By Helen E. McKinney

    Oldham County History Center

    December is a time to make lasting memories and remember the ones we hold dear. We owe a great debt to our service men and women who cannot always be home with family during the holidays. Because of their protection we are able to live in a free country with family and friends to make memories that linger.

  • The South Oldham Rotary Club continues its tradition of giving back to the community.

    At their Dec. 13 meeting the club presented a check to representatives from Camden Elementary, Crestwood Elementary, Kenwood Station and South Oldham Middle School. The funds will go to help students that need support and help.

  • Grace and beauty have led to scholarship money for one local teen.

    Prospect resident Bailey Wharton was recently crowned Miss River City Outstanding Teen. This was the third pageant in which Bailey, 16, has ever competed. She won the first pageant she entered, the Miss Central Kentucky Outstanding Teen.

    That crowning allowed her to compete in last year’s Miss Kentucky Outstanding Teen, where she was third runner up.

    With one state competition already under her belt, Wharton is ready for a bigger crown.

  • Several cities had their Christmas and holiday celebrations the first weekend of December, regardless of bad weather.

  • Several cities had their Christmas and holiday celebrations the first weekend of December, regardless of bad weather.

  • Photographer E. Ann Stroth knows no boundaries when she seeks to depict an image in the most creative way possible. After nearly 30 years in commercial photography, she is a master of the technical tools available to her but is always aware of the creative element.

    “It really is a balancing act,” she said. “I believe that some people get so involved in the technical details that they forget to enjoy the creative process.”

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    With eight kids in the house, Debbie Lance needs two calendars to keep track of every appointment.

    Foster parents Debbie and Roger Lance currently have 17 kids in their lives. Between the 10 biological children from previous marriages, the three adopted children and the four they are currently fostering, the Lance household in Centerfield is always busy.

    Debbie has always known she wanted to be a foster mother. Before her marriage to Roger in 2005, she gave him an ultimatum.

  • Two local churches are helping make Christmas special for students at a school in the mountains of eastern Kentucky.

    Pewee Valley Presbyterian and Crestwood Christian Church are taking donations for the Lotts Creek Settlement School, which is based in Knott County.

    One shared member, Jill MacNiven, who leads mission trips to the school and collects donations year-round, is leading the church’s Christmas time donations.

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    Traci Missun has become indispensable to the local farm community.

    “Generally when I have a problem I call Traci, and if she doesn’t have the answer, she finds it,” Caldwell Willig, president of the Oldham County Cattlemen’s Association, said. “She’s done a lot for me as a farmer. She’s very supportive in a lot of ways in terms of our farm.”

  • Oldham County is a place many call home. Its history is steeped in a rich and colorful past that has been preserved through various court documents, diaries, old newspapers, letters and oral histories. Dr. Nancy Sterns Theiss, Ph. D. has taken these stories and compiled them into a book that takes a fascinating look at a county that has a strong connection to the Ohio River and has played an important role in shaping the state of Kentucky.

  • At first glance, it may not seem like Lisa Wells has struggled with health issues.

    But the Crestwood resident has defeated two types of cancer before hitting her 40th birthday. Less than two years out from her latest diagnosis, Wells recently became a big fundraiser for an annual cancer walk in the area. 

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