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Features

  • The Great Pumpkin is alive and well in Oldham County this season, despite shortages across other pumpkin-farming states.

    Pumpkin crops in many northeastern states were devastated by Hurricane Irene, which flooded fields in August. Even before that, heavy rains in the northeast delayed plantings, setting back the Halloween-timed main harvest.

    In Oldham, however, pumpkins had a good season, according to several area farmers. 

  • Despite the drizzle and chill Saturday morning, over 100 people attended the first Oldham County Hike ‘n’ Bike event on Commerce Parkway.

  • When she arrives at work each day, Susan Eubank is happy. Happy to see staff, patrons and products — none of which she could see from her old office.

  • From buffalo production to philanthropic giving, Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson are well-known for their work in Oldham County.
    Their extensive contributions will be recognized at the annual Oldham County Historical Society gala this year.

  • Every Kentuckian can name at least one famous Thoroughbred.

    But not many can tell you stories of the not-so-famous ones.

    Ask Kim Smith, though, and she’ll tell you about Krismas Cactus, Manchester, Finn, First and Gold ... And Lucky.

    She’ll definitely tell you about Lucky.

  • Fourteen years ago, Suzette Decker organized a neighborhood garage sale that included 30 friends and neighbors. Since then, Decker has found a few more people to join in — about 1,000 of them.
    Decker’s KidStuff Sale consignment events draw that many vendors to its events, with a spring and fall event each in Buckner, Louisville and Southern Indiana.

  • Metro United Way announced Sept. 5 it has approved seed funding for Oldham County’s Hope Health Clinic.
    The clinic is scheduled to open in September and provide access to quality, affordable health care to the uninsured in Carroll, Henry, Oldham and Trimble counties.

  • A calendar featuring women wearing nothing but handmade quilts caught Don Dampier’s eye — but not for reasons you might think.
    Dampier plans to include the calendar and its creators in his upcoming book “The Quilter’s Quest.”

  • It is the shimmering light and the colors of glass that continue to intrigue stained glass artist David W. Kent, even after working with the medium for more than 30 years.

  • Oldham County Parks & Recreation has launched a WoodSongs Coffeehouse program to establish a “roots music” scene in the county.  
    “Roots music” can best be described as an acoustic-oriented style that may include, but is not limited to: bluegrass, country, gospel/spiritual and singer/songwriter.

  • Samantha Harrison said she was surprised to win the High School Big of the Year award from Big Brothers Big Sisters Kentucky. But those who have worked with her weren’t surprised at all.

    Harrison didn’t know she had been nominated by her match support specialist, Cassie Edinger. 

  • A Prospect girl has been selected as a finalist in the pre-teen division of a contest hosted by TheCuteKid.com.
    The Cute Kid contest is the largest of its kind and has been featured on Good Morning America, E!, The Wall Street Journal and many other publications as the most prestigious online child photo contest.

  • With acts ranging from folk music to martial arts demonstrations, the Crestwood Festival’s entertainment is guaranteed not to disappoint.
    Phifer Stephens with Heady-Radcliffe Funeral Home and Cremation Services has coordinated gospel-themed entertainment for Friday, Sept. 9.

  • Oldham County Parks and Recreation is launching a coffeehouse for musicians and music lovers to provide a home for the roots music scene in the area.
    Parks and recreation Director Tim Curtis said, “I’ve been throwing around the idea of having a song-writing competition for a couple of years.”

  • Friends of a local family are coming together to help one of their own.
    Hometown Pizza of La Grange is hosting a Hope for Hayli concert and fundraiser August 6 from 6 to 11 p.m.
    Hope for Hayli is an organization dedicated to helping Hayli Ann Nobles.

  • The Oldham County Schools Arts Center welcomes you to experience the power of the arts and cultivate the artist within by becoming a part of their brand new dance program.

    Through dance, students travel down a path of self-discovery where creativity, self-discipline, social skills and life skills are nurtured along with a lifelong appreciation for the arts.

  • La Grange resident Nishea Sipley’s motto is “start small with big plans.”
    In May 2009, Sipley began making monogrammed ponytail holders and selling them on eBay for $3 each.
    When Sipley’s daughter Mali was born she received a monogrammed gift basket and it sparked her interest.
    “I had never sown anything before,” she said.

  • Coworkers, members of local government, friends, family and neighbors all gathered to honor Denia Crosby and her work in Oldham County.  
    Crosby has been a figure in Oldham County for 17 years.  
    She is a former mayor of the City of Orchard Grass Hills, served on the Oldham County Board of Health and the county’s planning and zoning

  • When you’re 18, what defines greatness?  That is, how do you stand out in a crowd?  
    When I was in high school, like most guys, I wanted to be a standout athlete. Others would want to be the smartest kid in class.
    Lots of people would wish to be voted most popular.
    Recently we lost an extraordinary young man in our community, John Powell.

  • Employees of Wal-Mart in La Grange found a box in their parking lot containing seven abandoned kittens.

    The kittens appear to be from two different litters.

    They were dehydrated from the extreme heat, and would have died had quick thinking Wal-Mart employees not immediately notified Animal Control.