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Features

  • It's no secret that Sheila Nobles loves her job.

    Though only 5-foot-1 1/2, Nobles is hard to miss with her large hat and bubbly personality. She is one of Kentucky’s milliners, or hat makers, who are known for their Derby hats.

    Nobles is now in her 12th year of hat making with her business partner Kevin Swansey. Together the two make up CK Nobles Millinery Designs, who tout a decade long run as the official milliners of the Kentucky Derby Museum.

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    Persistent ankle weakness led Michael Hamilton to a diagnosis he never expected.

    The 48-year-old father and grandfather was diagnosed with ALS in August 2013 after months of testing. Recently, Hamilton’s oldest daughter Jennifer has started an online fundraiser to buy her father a handicap accessible van.

  • By HELEN E. MCKINNEY

    OLDHAM COUNTY HISTORY CENTER

    For as long as he can remember, Milt Toby has always been involved in some aspect of the horse industry. Intending to become a veterinarian, he eventually decided upon a different course and began writing about the horse racing industry.

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    It’s hard to argue that fate didn’t intervene in the lives of John and Renee Rothschild.

    The Rothschild’s story begins in one of the darkest periods of human history, the Holocaust. This time of persecution under the Nazi Regime inadvertently lead to the meeting of two people whose love for each other saved them.

  • Forty-two seconds.

    That’s how long it took for Tee Salinas, a senior at North Oldham High School, to transition from lovable team manager to the most-celebrated player on the Mustangs’ squad this season.

    Others might argue it took seven years of hard work and determination.

    But with seven minutes and sixteen seconds left in the first quarter of NOHS’ senior night last Friday, Tee Salinas scored a layup that rattled the school’s gym in Goshen.

    Tee had arrived.

    ‘Most likely to brighten your day’

  • A sleepy, blue-eyed three-year-old takes a small musical recorder and holds it close to his mouth.

    His hair is thin and he’s a little weary, but he takes a breath and blows into the recorder anyway. Sebastian Edelen is officially awake now. And so is everyone else.

    Good thing it’s 3 p.m. on a Thursday.

    Moments later, Sebastian is playing his own tune, practicing to become an amateur photographer and squealing like a normal little boy.

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    Doc isn’t your average librarian. Upon entering the library he is greeted with excited but confused faces. A quick stroll over to the circulation desk ends in wet-nosed greetings and a wagging tail.

    Doc is one of six therapy dogs the Oldham County Public Library utilizes for their PAWs to Read program. The program allows readers of all levels to sit with a trained therapy dog and read aloud to build literacy skills.

  • The Little Colonel Players present Guilty Conscience, by Richard L. Levinson and William Link, and directed by Theresa Wentzel, opening Feb. 13 at the Little Colonel Playhouse, 302 Mt. Mercy Drive, Pewee Valley.

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    Jerry McCandless typically isn’t seen.

    Whether it’s his business, often represented by “guys in white suits” cleaning up after traffic accidents or his work in higher education, McCandless typically eludes the spotlight.

    But in March, McCandless will be center stage as one of 27 inductees into the new Kentucky Veteran’s Hall of Fame, located in Frankfort.

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    Prospect area “stars” are busy putting the finishing touches on their ballroom dance routines as part of a fundraising effort for six local charities and the Prospect Area Chamber of Commerce.

    On Feb. 9 at the Mellwood Arts Center in Louisville each star will perform their routines choreographed and perfected by professionals from Derby City Ballroom over the course of 12 weeks. During that time, each star is raising money for an area charity. Dancing With the Prospect Stars involves the following individuals and charities:

  • Jessica Bush rang in the new year with an unexpectedly early bundle of joy.

    Thomas Eugene Howard was born at 2 p.m. on Jan. 1 to Bush and Tommy Howard of Carrollton. Thomas was the first baby born in 2014 at Baptist Health La Grange. The healthy 7 pound, 8 ounce baby boy was 14 days early and measured 20 inches.

    “I’m pretty excited,” Bush said. “I’m a little nervous about having a boy.”

  • New Year’s is celebrated in America in different ways, usually with lots of friends, parties, confetti, party horns and staying up late to ring in the New Year. Visit the Oldham County History Center’s Peyton Samuel Head Museum and explore some New Year traditions celebrated around the world.

    This exhibit is geared toward children in a year-long effort to educate them about different cultures and the county in which they live.

  • Hear ye, hear ye. Be it known that “the 22nd day of January hereafter be observed as David Wark Griffith Day.”

    And so it has been since Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1975, in Oldham County when Judge Wendell Moore signed into affect a proclamation designating David Wark Griffith Day.

  • A new job is music to Amy Love’s ears.

    The Prospect resident was recently hired by St. Jude Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., to begin a music therapy program.

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    Danielle and Stephen Sauerbeck love a good scavenger hunt.

    So far, their love of such events has taken them to Chicago, Milwaukee, even Puerto Rico.

    That’s because the Sauerbeck’s participate in events similar to CBS’ The Amazing Race, which is a mix of scavenger hunts and travel, through two companies: Urban Race and Urban Dare.

  • Howls of praise will be ringing out this holiday season thanks to a local veterinary center.

    The “Joy to the Woof” program sponsored by the Pewee Valley Veterinary Center has created 25 care packages for military service dogs. In its second year, the program provides specialty gear like goggles and protective booties for the four-legged soldiers.

    “Unfortunately they are forgotten a lot of the time,” Carolyne Tilford, a veterinary technician at the center said. “They go through a lot, it’s not easy.”