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Features

  • Seeing a train in downtown La Grange isn’t unusual, but having one with a fresh coat of paint was until recently.

    Thanks to more than two dozen youth from La Grange Baptist Church, the train located outside of the La Grange Railroad Museum looks as good as new after a month of work.

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    A La Grange man is partnering with a well-known Oldham County restaurant for a fundraiser to help combat Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

    Mike Hamilton was diagnosed with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, almost two years ago. And he’s partnering with Gustavo’s in Crestwood for a fundraiser to improve his quality of life while sick.

  • One South Oldham High School grad is making the trip of a lifetime — nearly 3,000 miles.

    Luke Sparks joined 11 of his Western Kentucky University Phi Gamma Delta fraternity brothers on a bike ride to raise $100,000 for Alzheimer’s research.

    It’s the third trip for the fraternity. In 2010, a grandfather of a brother passed away from the debilitating disease causing the fraternity to ban together for the cause.

    The team traveled from in two different bike rides, where they raised close to $100,000, said Sparks.

  • Human resources is often referred to as “the business of people” and no one knows people better than Trasee Whitaker, senior vice president of human resources at Masonic Homes of Kentucky.

    Whitaker, of Crestwood, was chosen as one of “20 People to Know in Human Resources” by Business First, a Louisville publication.

    “It is an honor to be included along with other talented and influential HR colleagues that I admire as well,” Whitaker said.

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    Duane Murner is no stranger to acting like a politician.

    Having spent 12 years as one, after two terms as a fiscal court magistrate and one term as County Judge-Executive, Murner, a Prospect native, has the inside knowledge of what is expected of an elected official.

    But having retired from politics himself in 2010, Murner now just acts as a politician, namely former Kentucky Secretary of State Caleb Powers, as part of the Chautauqua program.

  • Providence Richwood, formerly The Richwood, hosted their annual Mother’s Day Breakfast for current residents, families and staff on Friday morning, May 9. Residents were treated to hair styling and makeup for the special event. All ladies in attendance were presented with their own beautiful corsage and served a delicious hot breakfast by the staff at the nursing and rehab center.

  • As one of the biggest names in racing and a family lineage in stock cars, it seems odd NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. would have considered anything but racing cars in his lifetime.

    But one of most popular racers ever said he has always had a backup plan if racing on Sunday afternoons in stock car racing’s highest circuit didn’t work and encouraged students at Oldham County High School to “always have a backup plan” during a visit to the school last week.

  • More than 100 injured veterans spent Monday on a wet ride through Oldham County, all in the name of raising awareness of their cause.

    The cyclists were part of the United Healthcare Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge, a weeklong, 450-mile cycling trip from Covington to Nashville, Tenn.

    Their trip led them down U.S. 42 on Monday for a quick lunch stop at the North Oldham Fire Department’s Skylight station. Kroger and the United Service Organizations (USO) provided lunch. It was the second day of the seven-day journey south.

  • Becoming an Eagle Scout is a goal of thousands of Boy Scouts across the U.S., and is usually achieved by the time a scout reaches his late teens.

    So when Prospect resident Logan Salazar earned the honor before his 13th birthday, it took a big achievement and amplified it.

    “To be that focused and to get that much done at 12 years old is huge,” Don Vogel, Logan’s scoutmaster, said. “And it’s not lost on him.”

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    The Duncan Memorial Chapel in Crestwood is getting a much needed face lift.

    The 21 stained glass windows that line the chapel are being restored to make them more visible from the outside, Ted Merhoff, secretary of the Floydsburg Cemetery, said.

    “Stained glass has a life time that requires a lot of maintenance,” Merhoff said.

  • It's no secret that Sheila Nobles loves her job.

    Though only 5-foot-1 1/2, Nobles is hard to miss with her large hat and bubbly personality. She is one of Kentucky’s milliners, or hat makers, who are known for their Derby hats.

    Nobles is now in her 12th year of hat making with her business partner Kevin Swansey. Together the two make up CK Nobles Millinery Designs, who tout a decade long run as the official milliners of the Kentucky Derby Museum.

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    Persistent ankle weakness led Michael Hamilton to a diagnosis he never expected.

    The 48-year-old father and grandfather was diagnosed with ALS in August 2013 after months of testing. Recently, Hamilton’s oldest daughter Jennifer has started an online fundraiser to buy her father a handicap accessible van.

  • By HELEN E. MCKINNEY

    OLDHAM COUNTY HISTORY CENTER

    For as long as he can remember, Milt Toby has always been involved in some aspect of the horse industry. Intending to become a veterinarian, he eventually decided upon a different course and began writing about the horse racing industry.

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    It’s hard to argue that fate didn’t intervene in the lives of John and Renee Rothschild.

    The Rothschild’s story begins in one of the darkest periods of human history, the Holocaust. This time of persecution under the Nazi Regime inadvertently lead to the meeting of two people whose love for each other saved them.

  • Forty-two seconds.

    That’s how long it took for Tee Salinas, a senior at North Oldham High School, to transition from lovable team manager to the most-celebrated player on the Mustangs’ squad this season.

    Others might argue it took seven years of hard work and determination.

    But with seven minutes and sixteen seconds left in the first quarter of NOHS’ senior night last Friday, Tee Salinas scored a layup that rattled the school’s gym in Goshen.

    Tee had arrived.

    ‘Most likely to brighten your day’

  • A sleepy, blue-eyed three-year-old takes a small musical recorder and holds it close to his mouth.

    His hair is thin and he’s a little weary, but he takes a breath and blows into the recorder anyway. Sebastian Edelen is officially awake now. And so is everyone else.

    Good thing it’s 3 p.m. on a Thursday.

    Moments later, Sebastian is playing his own tune, practicing to become an amateur photographer and squealing like a normal little boy.

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    Doc isn’t your average librarian. Upon entering the library he is greeted with excited but confused faces. A quick stroll over to the circulation desk ends in wet-nosed greetings and a wagging tail.

    Doc is one of six therapy dogs the Oldham County Public Library utilizes for their PAWs to Read program. The program allows readers of all levels to sit with a trained therapy dog and read aloud to build literacy skills.

  • The Little Colonel Players present Guilty Conscience, by Richard L. Levinson and William Link, and directed by Theresa Wentzel, opening Feb. 13 at the Little Colonel Playhouse, 302 Mt. Mercy Drive, Pewee Valley.