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Today's Opinions

  • GINGER: Cherished memories of Grandma

    My dad recently decided to sell the old family homestead.

    The last time I was there was right after the death of my precious grandmother. The house was to be rented, and my job was to clean it before the new tenants arrived. The task proved to be more difficult than I had imagined.

    When I was a child, I always knew grandma would be waiting for me on the front porch. As she got older, she would greet me at the door.

  • COLUMN: New editor joins familiar territory

    My wife, Sarah, and I moved to Oldham County nearly 10 years ago.
    Having grown up here, I knew the area quite well.
    For Sarah, the outsider, the learning curve was more precipitous.
    When needing to get somewhere in Crestwood, La Grange or Goshen, Sarah would often come to me for directions. Those conversations sometimes went like this:
    Sarah: “How do you get to (fill in the blank)?”
    Me: “Do you remember where (fill in the blank) used to be?”
    Sarah:  “No.”

  • COLUMN: New editor joins familiar territory

    My wife, Sarah, and I moved to Oldham County nearly 10 years ago.
    Having grown up here, I knew the area quite well.
    For Sarah, the outsider, the learning curve was more precipitous.
    When needing to get somewhere in Crestwood, La Grange or Goshen, Sarah would often come to me for directions. Those conversations sometimes went like this:
    Sarah: “How do you get to (fill in the blank)?”
    Me: “Do you remember where (fill in the blank) used to be?”
    Sarah:  “No.”

  • EDITORIAL: The era of an unprecedented election

    This week, thousands of parents, teachers, volunteers and staff members who contribute to the success of students in the Oldham County district received a 1,000-word tirade from Superintendent Will Wells.

    His message? He combined criticism of the local newspaper for publishing differing opinions with yet another pat-on-the-back for the Oldham County Board of Education’s five elected officials.

  • EDITORIAL: The era of an unprecedented election

    This week, thousands of parents, teachers, volunteers and staff members who contribute to the success of students in the Oldham County district received a 1,000-word tirade from Superintendent Will Wells.

    His message? He combined criticism of the local newspaper for publishing differing opinions with yet another pat-on-the-back for the Oldham County Board of Education’s five elected officials.

  • LETTER: Nature preserve provides a peaceful library site

    To the editor:
    I read with enjoyment the article in the recent special edition of The Oldham Era concerning the Creasey-Mahan Nature Preserve. It is a beautiful nature preserve, well-managed, and an asset to the entire Oldham community.
    The vision of the late Virginia Creasey and her husband Howard Mahan is being realized by an interested and active volunteer board. Director Tavia Cathcart Brown has been instrumental in providing wonderful active and educational nature programs concerning the local flora and fauna.

  • LETTER: County, school district continue spending despite economic crisis

    To the editor:
    I would like to thank the Republican Party for their endorsement in the Division 3 seat for Oldham County Board of Education, however, I would like voters to know that this is a nonpartisan race. I am in this school board race to represent the children, parents, teachers and taxpayers of Oldham County.
    I am opposed to increasing taxes at the present time, especially with a looming economic crisis in America, Kentucky and Oldham County.

  • LETTER: The Brownsboro school of dreams: ‘Build it and they will come’

    To the editor:
    In the movie “Field of Dreams,” a farmer builds a baseball field in the middle of an Iowa cornfield because voices tell him, “Build it and they will come.”
    The local board of education either saw the movie or talked to their favorite local developer, who sold Oldham County Schools three properties — totaling 157 acres and $4.8 million — between November 2007 and October 2009.
    In either case, the planned 700-student Brownsboro Elementary School would be a certain hit as a rerun.