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Columns

  • Everyone’s good here

    One of the most memorable places I’ve ever been is the House of Anne Frank in Amsterdam. One of the most startling lines I have ever read in any book was the quote in Anne Frank’s book The Diary of a Young Girl that read: “I do believe that deep within his (her) heart, every person is good.” She made this statement as she was being hunted down by the Nazis.

  • The distinction between Christianity and religion

    Our kids are not perfect. Neither are parents for that matter. I believe with my entire being that my faith in Jesus Christ, and the truth of the scriptures has been the key to just about everything I have ever done right as a father.

  • Short story about a tall family

    Occasionally, I will see someone whose height catches my eye. It doesn’t happen very often though, because I live with tall people. So, if someone appears tall to me, that means they are extraordinarily giant like.

    At 6’4”, hubby is a full foot taller than I am. For years, he was the tallest in the family until our son bypassed him, topping out at 6’6”. Our daughter tried to catch up, but stopped growing at just over six foot. None of them play basketball, but thank you for asking.

  • Pratt: Who’s the new guy?

    Hey there, Oldham County!

    A few of you have already met me, but for those who haven’t, I’m the new sports guy.

    Let me share some things about this new guy.

  • Why is the Bible true?

    As I finished up my seminary training and entered into ministry I was full of questions about the authority of scripture. Regrettably, I would pretend parts were not there that I didn’t like, “de-mythologize” other parts that seemed to be based on unscientific world views or superstition, and explain away parts that I disagreed with. With my background in Hebrew and Greek I could even overwhelm anyone who might disagree with me through my brilliance. All this fed my arrogance which made me a much less effective minister than I imagined in my own mind.

  • Parting is such sweet sorrow

    I’m not really a fan of goodbyes.

    No one ever knows how to finish one, there’s always awkwardness and it’s just really a difficult situation altogether.

    And it’s not much easier when you have to put it in print.

    If you haven’t guessed by now, this is my goodbye as editor of The Oldham Era. Rest assured, I’m leaving the place in great hands. Publisher Melissa Blankenship will still be at the helm, as will reporter Taylor Riley.

  • Some things you just can’t plan

    I’ve always been a planner. I have a precise schedule in my head, a physical copy in a spiral-bound book and several alarms set in my phone. I guess you could call it a control problem, but I would call it preparedness.

    I plan down to the minute of my day.

    This is when I have to be at work. This is when I eat. This is when I go to the gym. This is when I go to sleep.

    I even plan in my personal life. A phone call goes out to my mom at 5 p.m., my best friend at 6 p.m., dinner with friends at 7 p.m., favorite show at 8 p.m.

  • Shine some light on your ‘roots’

    By PATRICE M. SMITH

    Let’s talk about your plants’ basic needs so they may flourish and grow healthy, promoting longevity.

    The number one basic need of any plant is light. Many plants such as Irises, Roses, and trees require full light. Other plants such as Azaleas, Rhododendrons and Hosta, require little direct light or shade. Whichever type of plant, the leaves need light because they are the plant’s food factory and light is the power source that helps them manufacture food from air and soil.

  • Prepping for STEM careers

    Last week, many of our schools celebrated Engineering Week with innovative projects and guest speakers. This is reflective of the emphasis on STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — across the country as we look ahead to a future in which one million STEM jobs will be available by 2018. However, the United States is projected to only graduate 200,000 students qualified for those same jobs.

  • ‘Tell’-ing everything without saying a word

    I love watching and studying people and trying to figure them out. I learned recently that a “tell” is the physical manifestation of the truth. A card player uses tells to determine if his opponent is bluffing. He watches for certain mannerisms and associates them with winning and losing. The opponent might raise his eyebrows or clench his fist when he has a winning hand or clear his throat or rub his chin when the cards don’t fall his way.