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Columns

  • The British Perception: blending in across the pond

    The interesting thing about being in certain parts of Europe is that as a white, middle-aged, American woman it is entirely possible to blend. There are a few dead giveaways: blonde highlights, chubbiness and loudness are stereotypes that Europeans immediately attribute to American women. But if I wear the right coat, hat and scarf, keep my mouth shut and don’t make any sudden movements, chances are no one will know I was not born and bred here.

  • Being caught up in the ‘seven deadlies’

    The “seven deadly sins” are seven common ways many people continue to deaden themselves to life’s goodness. They often use pride, lust, laziness, envy, anger, covetousness, and excess to gain satisfaction and fulfillment in areas where they will never find it.

  • Biblical preparation for Halloween

    Comic Jim Gaffigan shares some humorous thoughts about Halloween. He says, “My favorite holiday is Halloween, and not because women use the opportunity to dress like prostitutes… As a kid Halloween was amazing. You dress like a super hero, bang on your neighbor’s door and they give you some candy. If I do that today then my neighbor wants me arrested.”

  • Ask the Expert: Long term care questions

    The best place to start with long term care is to understand all levels of care and where your loved one falls in that category to make a decision for placement. Every individual is different and so are the needs of that person.

    Kentucky has four levels of care. I look at it like a step ladder:

  • Fellowship and friends are more important

    When I was in seminary my parents wrote to me every week. I can’t remember most of what they wrote. Inside the letter would be the latest family news, sports updates and occasionally a dollar or two. Letter writing then and emails now are a wonderful way to communicate with those we love.

  • Expanding the arts in Oldham County
  • Need finds a voice

    There are many times when I like to be alone, close my eyes and express to God in words the feelings of my heart. That is prayer. Sometimes I pray as I am walking along the street or driving my car. I don’t close my eyes then, though I often speak the words. At other times I pray when I am in a group and don’t care to express my thoughts through speech. Though kneeling, closing eyes or using an expression of words may be helpful in prayer, one can pray without the use of any of these.

  • Thankfully, he still fits on my lap

    Hudson Charles is my loving, little boy, always showering me with kisses and hugs. He is also my worrier. His worries are much deeper than those of the average six-year-old. Many days, I take him onto my lap and attempt to wipe the creases from his brow. I can’t remove all of his fears. Fears that his heart will stop beating or that he will have a bad dream when he falls asleep. But I can help him understand that the police in Belize will not send him to jail for taking his seatbelt off that one time.

  • Surrender to the power of the Holy Spirit

    My friend, theologian Brad Long, tells of a Sunday when Billy Graham came to Montreat Presbyterian Church to ask for prayer for his upcoming trip to North Korea.

  • Using God’s unconditional love in our own lives

    Fifteen years ago God sent me on an amazing journey to China to adopt my youngest daughter, Danielle. I knew as I looked into the eyes of the bewildered little girl (she was two and a half years old when we adopted her), that the amazing journey was just beginning. I have to admit I had an element of self-pride when I thought about how we would change this little orphan’s life by bringing her to the U.S. Was I in for a great surprise when I found out God had plans to use my daughter to teach me many important Bible lessons about life.