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Columns

  • Strides made, but health issues still concern in Kentucky

    Of all the challenges Kentucky can expect to face in the years ahead, few are bigger than improving our collective health.

    In some key areas, we already have a head start. Kentucky is among the top 20 states in fighting infectious diseases, for example, with the use of vaccines high and the percentage of our older citizens getting a flu shot above the national average.

  • Don’t cultivate greed

    The seeds of greed are present in every human heart.  In some, these seeds subtly take root and gradually begin to influence our decisions, preventing us from achieving what we value most.

    In others, they grow into giant weeds that choke the joy out of life. Greed is a deep longing for something that drives us to the point where we are willing to do whatever it takes to acquire it.

  • State’s revenue future looking brighter

    They may be relatively unknown and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the eight economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect each year.

    As anyone who has ever put a budget together knows, it can be tough to predict what a year will bring. Their job, however, is even more difficult: They have to look more than 30 months ahead, to cover not just the two-year span for the budget but also the six additional months needed to prepare, pass and implement it.

  • Surpises in store when children attempt ‘Big Ugly Challenge’

    Sometimes, I forget to be a good mom and do things like warn my 9-year-old son that if he partakes of the American Legion’s All-You-Can-Eat Biscuit and Gravy Breakfast, he probably shouldn’t enter the festival pizza eating contest a few hours later. 

    He was downing a third slice when I noticed a slight gray pallor to his face. Before I could reach him, it all came back up, splattering the stage with pepperonis, partially digested gravy, and slimy chunks of biscuit.

  • TRUITT: Finding hope in the eyes of a newborn

    Fifteen years ago, we celebrated my mother’s life at her funeral.

    Because she was a school teacher, it was a grand funeral with hundreds of people in attendance.

    The memory that stands out most is of her third-grade class tearfully singing a song in her honor. They had only been back from spring break one day when she fell ill at school and was rushed to the hospital.

    She died at the age of 47.

    In four years, I will be 47.

    The closer I get, the more I realize how truly young my mom was.

  • MUELLER: The dignity of living

    So many people feel insignificant, unworthy and unimportant.

    The truth of the matter is there are no unimportant people and no unimportant events.

    A man sat in the shade of a tree and saw an apple fall and discovered the law of gravity. His name was Isaac Newton.

    Another man sat in the kitchen and saw a teakettle steam. It was a significant experience because, seeing that teakettle, he discovered the principle of the steam engine. His name was Robert Fulton.

    There are no insignificant people or insignificant events.

  • GINGER: Am I middle-aged?

    At 43, it’s probably time to stop saying, “when” I become middle-aged, and accept that I’ve arrived. I don’t know what the official marker is for middle-aged, but I seriously doubt I’m going to make it to 86. 

  • The three Rs of youth: Role models, rebellion and relationships

    We all had role models growing up. Maybe you still do.

    Who was your role model? Why did you choose the person? What qualities did he/she possess?

    Did your role model fall in your eyes over time? 

  • MUELLER: Showing compassion

    Mayor Greg Fischer has proclaimed Louisville to be “Compassion City.” 

    What a noble thing to do! For compassion is the unique human ability to care about other people, to be considerate of others and sensitive to their needs. 

  • COLUMN: Packing peace of mind

    Nestled inside a grocery sack filled with pint-sized cartons of shelf-stable chocolate milk, four containers of banana yogurt and other kid-friendly snacks is a book about being scared that I hope my daughter will never open without me.

    I recently shopped for supplies to keep our daughter, Harper, happy and well-fed for at least 24 hours in the event of an emergency that prevents us from reaching her preschool.