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Columns

  • Fine-tune your etiquette when visiting the sick

    What do you do and say to people who have cancer or any life-limiting illness? Early in my ministry, I had a wonderful mentor – Father Jim Hendricks. He died several years ago, but was amazing in his care for the sick. I learned from him not by pointers he gave me but by following his good example.

    When you find someone has a serious illness, hold the gasps. They’re still among the living. Simply ask, “What can I do to be most helpful?”

    Then listen for an answer.

    Here’s what you need to do:

  • New programs, upgrades greet OC students

    Your kids may disagree with me, but I think the first day of school is one of the best days of the year. It’s a day full of promise, of excitement, of change. It’s a milestone — for parents and students — that marks another chapter in life.

    When your children head off for their first day this year, know that our staff members at Oldham County Schools are committed to continuing the tradition of excellence in our district.

  • ‘Fishing’ trip leads nowhere on child’s 21st birthday

    Last week, on the occasion of my eldest child’s 21st birthday, I spent most of the day trying to garner compliments. 

    Perhaps “compliment” is the wrong word. It was really reassurance that I needed. I didn’t care who said it, I just wanted to hear those magical words: “My goodness, young lady! You do not look anywhere near old enough to have a 21-year-old daughter!”

  • Presidency to world records: Kentuckians made many firsts

    For generations now, students have been taught that Abraham Lincoln was the first native Kentuckian to be U.S. President.

    Technically speaking, however, that’s not true.

  • Fashion statement – a faux pas or just ‘fail’?

    As we were leaving for an annual bluegrass party, hubby glanced at me and remarked, “Oh. You’re wearing that.”

    “You told me you like this shirt.”

    “I do like it. I just didn’t know you were actually wearing it.”

  • Strides made, but health issues still concern in Kentucky

    Of all the challenges Kentucky can expect to face in the years ahead, few are bigger than improving our collective health.

    In some key areas, we already have a head start. Kentucky is among the top 20 states in fighting infectious diseases, for example, with the use of vaccines high and the percentage of our older citizens getting a flu shot above the national average.

  • Don’t cultivate greed

    The seeds of greed are present in every human heart.  In some, these seeds subtly take root and gradually begin to influence our decisions, preventing us from achieving what we value most.

    In others, they grow into giant weeds that choke the joy out of life. Greed is a deep longing for something that drives us to the point where we are willing to do whatever it takes to acquire it.

  • State’s revenue future looking brighter

    They may be relatively unknown and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the eight economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect each year.

    As anyone who has ever put a budget together knows, it can be tough to predict what a year will bring. Their job, however, is even more difficult: They have to look more than 30 months ahead, to cover not just the two-year span for the budget but also the six additional months needed to prepare, pass and implement it.

  • Surpises in store when children attempt ‘Big Ugly Challenge’

    Sometimes, I forget to be a good mom and do things like warn my 9-year-old son that if he partakes of the American Legion’s All-You-Can-Eat Biscuit and Gravy Breakfast, he probably shouldn’t enter the festival pizza eating contest a few hours later. 

    He was downing a third slice when I noticed a slight gray pallor to his face. Before I could reach him, it all came back up, splattering the stage with pepperonis, partially digested gravy, and slimy chunks of biscuit.

  • TRUITT: Finding hope in the eyes of a newborn

    Fifteen years ago, we celebrated my mother’s life at her funeral.

    Because she was a school teacher, it was a grand funeral with hundreds of people in attendance.

    The memory that stands out most is of her third-grade class tearfully singing a song in her honor. They had only been back from spring break one day when she fell ill at school and was rushed to the hospital.

    She died at the age of 47.

    In four years, I will be 47.

    The closer I get, the more I realize how truly young my mom was.