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Columns

  • Push for education doesn’t end with governor’s proposal

    Previously, in theJan. 9 edition of the Oldham Era, Dr. Will Wells, Superintendent, Oldham County Schools, submitted an article calling for legislators to step up for education. His voice ignited a spark in the Oldham community, and potentially further, that started people talking.

  • Mueller: ‘Tis a gift to be simple

    “Tis a gift to be simple,” sang the Shakers, and the lyric still rings true. Simplicity in its essence neither demands a vow of poverty nor a life of rural homesteading. It requires neither a log cabin nor a hairshirt. It does require a deliberate ordering of priorities to distinguish between the necessary and the superfluous, the useful and the wasteful, the beautiful and the vulgar.

  • Al Earley: Can You Define Humility?

    How humble are you? I think of humility as one of those things that is easier to recognize than it is to define. For example, my dictionary defines humility as a state or quality of being humble of mind or spirit. It is the absence of pride or self-assertion. That doesn’t really capture the power of encountering a truly humble person, does it?

  • Minimizing the parenting risks leads to successful children

    Recently, I read a claim that parents who do not allow their children to take risks are setting them up to fail in life. Half the time, I forget I even have kids. Hubby, on the other hand, is extremely overprotective. When we saw the movie “The Croods” every one of our children looked straight at their dad when the caveman father exclaimed, “Never not be afraid!”

    They are not allowed to climb trees. (But if it will make a good photo op, I make sure hubby never sees the photo.)

  • Onward and downward

    We humans live with failure. We often experience more failure than success. When failure is respected and appreciated, it responds with great generosity, delighted we have not turned away from the substance of our own lives and happy to do whatever it can to forge the deepening of our experience. Onward and downward we go.

  • Eschatology: The study of the end times

    As a collegiate and religion major in the 1970’s I encountered a book that had many people wondering about the future. “The Late Great Planet Earth” by Hal Lindsey took a speculative look at a variety of historical events and tried to blend sections of scripture that are difficult to understand with those events to come up with an approximate date of when the end history as we know it on earth would occur. This is known as the eschaton and the study of the end of time is known as eschatology.

  • Choice isn’t a bad thing for Oldham Countians

    Let’s talk about choice.

    The term choice has gotten a bad rap the past few years. Especially “Pro-Choice,” because it has come to define the abortion issue. Pro-choice has come to identify those people who have little or no problem with aborting unborn children. As much as I believe such a choice is wrong, and that it involves killing a human being, that’s not what I want to discuss today.

    Today I want to talk about choice in our political leaders. Specifically about having a choice in whom we elect.

  • Stroke is an emergency, know the signs

    For every hour that a stroke is untreated, 120 million irreplaceable brain cells die and the brain ages 3.6 years.

    Your quick response in recognizing stroke symptoms and calling for help is vital to your future health. Stroke is very treatable if you recognize the situation and seek help immediately.

    If you notice any of these signs, don’t hesitate. Call 911 immediately.

    • Severe headache

    • Sudden dizziness

    • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes

    • Sudden confusion

  • Wake up with anticipation

    How do you wake up in the morning? Do you dread the day ahead every day? Wake up with anticipation.

  • The potter and the clay: God is working on you

    Most of us have had the experience of working with clay. The lump of clay feels good in our hands as we work it and make it soft. Then we make it into something of our own creation. It probably isn’t very good by worldly standards, but we were probably impressed with what we made because we made it.

    One thing I can guarantee you is that the clay never told us what it wanted us to make it into.

    Jeremiah is inspired by God to use the powerful image of God as the potter and you and I as clay.