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Today's News

  • Goshen approves budget for new fiscal year

    In its regular commission meeting, the City of Goshen approved the 2015-16 fiscal year budget and tax ordinance last Monday.
    The second reading of the budget came after three controversial meetings beginning May 12.
    In May’s regular meeting, citizens raised their voices in concern at the “incompetence” of the commission and its inability to appropriate the city’s money.
    After a few budget meetings, the commission finally agreed on amendments in the proposed budget and a first reading was held June 8.

  • Fence built at Wilborn Park to keep geese out

    Last July, former La Grange Mayor Bill Lammlein ordered the killing of 22 geese in Wilborn Park. Since that controversial decision, an ad-hoc committee was created to come up with a solution for the geese overpopulation and droppings.
    Last week, youth from La Grange Baptist Church built one of those solutions — a picket fence around the pavilion in the park in an effort to keep the geese out.
    The fence was built in a u-shape with one end open for people to enter and exit.  

  • Physicians bring new accessible healthcare office to Crestwood

    It’s not uncommon that when a child is sick unexpectedly, a parent must take off work sometimes a full day to take their child to an urgent care facility or to the emergency room because their primary care doctor isn’t available. And with the high price of medical insurance premiums, some patients don’t see their doctors as much as they wish they could.
    A solution to both of these problems may be found at a new family doctor’s office located in Crestwood.

  • La Grange childcare facility expands

    After eight years in La Grange, The Learning Garden Preschool and Child Development Center has begun construction on the expansion of their building on Commerce Parkway.
    The expanded facility will add two additional classrooms making the facility 12,000 square feet. According to executive director and owner Raquel Ritschel, it’s in anticipation of population growth.

  • History Camp teaches students about World War II

     Boys ages 7-12 learn about the way soldiers lived at The Oldham County History Center’s World War II Camp on June 19.
      For information about other camps offered at The History Center, visit www.oldhamcountyhistoricalsoicety.org.

     

  • New state laws go into effect June 24

     Most new laws approved during the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2015 regular session go into effect this week.                     

  • Booster seat law now in effect

      A new child safety seat law took effect June 24. Governor Steve Beshear signed the booster seat bill into law on June 15, requiring children younger than nine and between 40 and 57 inches tall be secured in a booster seat.
    The bill requires law enforcement officers to issue citations to violators with a $30 fine, although no court costs will be assessed. In addition, violators will have the option to purchase a booster seat instead of paying the fine.

  • The Affordable Shop & Treasures celebrates 35 years

    The first consignment shop that opened in Oldham County is celebrating their 35th year this month.
    Located on Highway 146 in La Grange near Buckner, The Affordable Shop & Treasures sells clothing, furniture, home décor and knick-knacks.  
    Ida and Sonny Myers opened the store in June of 1980. Seventeen years later Ida’s sister and brother-in-law Shirley and Bob Luhman purchased it from them.
    Since 2010, Paulette and James Lawson have owned The Affordable Shop and have added “& Treasures” to the name.

  • Students place in state-wide writing contest

    Two Harmony Elementary students were recognized for their entries in the annual KET Young Writers contest.
    Charles Weaver won first place in the 2nd grade division for his entry, “An Out of this World Halloween Mystery.” Alexis Abboud placed third in the third grade division with her entry, “Adoption is Love."

  • Carriage House on track for incentives

    One of Oldham County’s largest employers, Carriage House/Ralcorp is on track to meet its incentive package under the Kentucky Business Investment Act.
    Oldham County Judge-Executive David Voegele said the county government is willing to rebate the 10 percent Insurance Premium Tax normally paid by Carriage House companies for up to 10 years.

    This would be in exchange for Carriage House meeting the state requirement of hiring 225 individuals to work in manufacturing and distribution services at Carriage House.