Today's News

  • David Levitch plays in prestigious Derby Festival Classic
  • South Oldham evens OC series with win

    It was wet and wild but South Oldham found a way to win, outlasting rival Oldham County 5-4 April 17 in a game delayed for 45 minutes because of lightning.
    For the second time this season, the Dragons turned the table on a district opponent that had previously beaten them, upending the Colonels one day after a 5-2 loss muddied the district picture.
    But early on, it looked like OC was the team to beat.

  • North, OC claim titles at Oldham County Championships

    Taking to Goshen for the Oldham County Championships, both the North Oldham and Oldham County track and field teams captured big wins April 18, laying claim as the county’s best.
    The Oldham County boys finished with a total score of 71, while North Oldham claimed second with a score of 69 and South finished third with 45 points. The North girls grabbed their first-ever championship with 84 points, while OC finished second with 81 and South grabbed third with 21 points.

  • North Oldham improves to 4-1 in district with win

    Needing a win to stay alive in the district race, the North Oldham took a huge step closer to securing the 29th District’s No. 1 seed Tuesday night, dispatching Oldham County 7-1 to move to 4-1 in district play.
    The Mustangs didn’t waste any time getting started, plating one run in the bottom of the inning on a sacrifice fly from catcher Peter Sohn.
    They added two more in the bottom of the second following an error and a bases-loaded walk.

  • School district to cut $3 million

    Oldham County Schools will begin the 2013-14 fiscal year July 1 with less money, fewer employees and longer bus routes.

    District officials are cutting $3 million from the budget and also losing an untold amount of federal funds.

    A rise in expenditures is “beyond our control,” Superintendent Will Wells said.

    In August, Wells will ask school board members to raise the district’s tax rate.

    Mandatory step raises for teachers and contributions to employee and retiree health plans comprise most of those costs, he explained.

  • Goshen woman crowned Kentucky Derby Festival Queen

    A South Oldham High School graduate is this year’s Kentucky Derby Festival Queen.

    Cameryn Jones was crowned by a spin of the wheel at the annual Fillies Derby Ball at the Galt House Friday night.

    Jones, of Goshen, is a senior at the University of Kentucky studying food science. She is a 2009 graduate of SOHS.

    Jones has been named to the dean’s list five times and serves as recruitment president and career & personal development director for the UK chapter of Chi Omega women’s fraternity.

  • Murder trial for drunk driver set Nov. 12, could be sooner

    A Louisville man charged with murder for a drunk-driving crash that led to the death of a Westport man could face trial earlier than scheduled.

    Nicholas W. “Nick” Snoddy appeared in Oldham circuit court recently, where his defense attorney and prosecutors discussed his Nov. 12 trial date.

    Snoddy, 23, has pleaded not guilty to murder, two counts of fleeing or evading police, four counts wanton endangerment of civilians and police officers, DUI (third offense), driving on a DUI-suspended license and speeding 26 mph over limit (or greater).

  • Crestwood man, 54, suffered stroke in jail, still needs evaluation

    The mental status of a Crestwood man indicted for sexual abuse of a teenager is still unclear after the defendant suffered a stroke nearly three months ago at the Oldham County Jail.

    Toby Mason, 54, faces 15 criminal charges, including use of a minor in a sexual performance, sodomy and custodial inference for sex acts he allegedly performed and videotaped with a teen girl in 2011.

    Mason suffered a stroke shortly after indictment in January. He now uses a wheelchair and is housed in a medical unit at the Kentucky State Reformatory while awaiting trial.

  • County-wide burn ban starts May 1

    A county-wide restriction on open burning goes into effect next week.

    The burn ban starts May 1 and continues through Sept. 30.

    Oldham County Emergency Management Director Kevin Nuss said the ban is mandated by the federal Clean Air Act to limit already-high pollution levels during the summer months.

    There are exemptions to the burn ban, including setting fires for cooking food (e.g., grills or cooking pits); recreational or ceremonial purposes (e.g., small bonfires or campfires); and recognized agricultural or wildlife management practices.

  • County employees could face more drug tests

    County employees could soon be required to attend yearly substance abuse training and be subject to more frequent alcohol and drug tests.

    Members of Oldham County Fiscal Court are considering a change to the county’s drug- and alcohol-free workplace policy.

    The policy would be amended to include yearly mandatory alcohol and substance abuse education and awareness training for all county employees.

    Initial training will last at least an hour with 30-minute review sessions each year thereafter.