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Today's News

  • Mathis, Frantz shut out Glenbard West in Derby City semis

    LOUISVILLE – South Oldham's players saved their energy for Wednesday night's Derby City Classic finals by making efficient work of Glenbard West (Ill.) Wednesday afternoon in the semifinals.

    Left-handers Eddie Mathis and Noah Frantz combined for seven shutout innings as the Dragons beat the Hilltoppers 2-0 at Butler High School. The game took only and hour and a half to play thanks to South's superb pitching effort.

  • North softball drops Monday doubleheader

    GOSHEN – North Oldham played two competitive games against out-of-state teams Monday, but came out on the losing end of both.

    The Lady Mustangs were beat 6-4 by Jeffersonville (Ind.) in the first contest and 6-5 by Limestone Community (Ill.) in the nightcap.

    The losses were the second and third straight for North (5-5), coming on the heels of a four-game winning streak.

    North trailed both games by multiple runs early, only to come back and tie or take the lead before falling late.

  • Mustang pitchers shut out Fern Creek

    LOUISVILLE – North Oldham showed off its arms Monday afternoon.
    Ethan Cleary and Adam Judd combined to hurl a six-hit shutout as North beat Fern Creek 4-0 at Southern High School in its opening game of the Derby City Classic.

    The Mustangs (5-3) went on to win their second game of the event, beating Southern 5-4 Tuesday afternoon.

    Cleary pitched the first 4 1/3 innings, scattering five hits but not allowing a run. Judd pitched the final 2 2/3 innings, allowing just one hit and one walk.

  • South grad makes Transy baseball history

    Braden Johnson put his name in the Transylvania University record books over the weekend.

    Johnson, a former South Oldham standout, threw the first no-hitter in the modern era of Transy baseball in a 12-0 win against Defiance College Sunday in Defiance, Ohio.

    Johnson’s performance was the first nine-inning no-hitter in Pioneer baseball history, dating to 1996. His no-hitter was also the first in Heartland Conference play since 2005.

  • South shuts down undefeated Ballard

    CRESTWOOD – Ballard came to Bill Cofer Field Thursday having won its first seven games and averaging eight runs per game over its last three.

    South Oldham pitching cooled off those Bruin bats.

    Drew Lively, Nate Patterson and Eddie Mathis combined to hold Ballard to just three hits over seven innings, including just one in the first six, as South beat the Bruins 7-2.

    The win was the second straight for the No. 16 Dragons (3-1), while the loss was the first of the year for No. 12 Ballard (7-1).

  • Eastern beats North Oldham in six

    GOSHEN – A North Oldham team that hadn't lost by more than one run all season was on the wrong end of a crooked scoreboard Wednesday.

    Eastern scored multiple runs in the third, fourth, fifth and sixth innings Wednesday on its way to a 15-4 win at North in six innings.

    The loss was the Mustangs' (3-3) third in its last four games.

    The Eagles (5-1) got on the board in the top of the second on a Clayton Campbell single off North left-hander Evan Cripe that scored Nick Eubanks.

  • Oldham man arrested, charged with sexual abuse

    An Oldham County man has been arrested and charged with one count of sexual abuse related to an alleged incident at his home.

    Kentucky State Police arrested Michael P. Berry, 36, of Drifton Drive in the Willow Creek subdivision, last Thursday after interviewing him at KSP Post 4 in Elizabethtown.

    According to the arrest report, Berry admitted to a KSP officer that he committed sexual abuse of a female minor during a two-week period at his Oldham County home in late February.

  • Bug causing damage to Pewee Valley scenery

     

    A destructive bug is causing major damage to the towering landmarks of Pewee Valley.

    The emerald ash borer is native to Russia, northern China, Japan and Korea. It first made an appearance in the U.S. in 2002. While it is not certain how the borer came to the U.S., it is suspected the insect migrated in shipping materials, according to information from the USDA Department of Forestry website on the ash borer.

    Now, 12 years later, the ash borer is ravaging ash trees in Pewee Valley.

  • School Board sets graduation
  • ‘SOME PIG’