Today's News

  • Weekend weather fuels criticism

    It’s been a long weekend for members of the Oldham County Schools’ administration.

    Severe weather at the end of the school day Friday and late Sunday evening forced district officials to face multiple tough decisions about having schools open.

    Tornados touched down in Kentucky and Indiana Friday, killing at least 34 people and causing major damage to several towns.

  • Committee narrows superintendent search to a dozen applicants

      A new superintendent will be in place by July for Oldham County Schools.

    According to Kevin Woosley, the school board’s representative on a search committee, about a dozen candidates are still in the running. 

  • False enrollment charges continue for Lyndon dad

    A grand jury indicted one parent charged with falsely enrolling his son in Oldham County Schools last month.

    Charles Lauron, 51, is charged with owing the school district about $26,000 after enrolling his son in Oldham County Schools for eight years, despite living in Lyndon.

    Lauron’s co-defendant, Donna Claggett, has been cleared of any wrong-doing.

  • Posh pets

    Dogs are man’s best friend, and man is willing to pay for the privilege. Pet owners continue to spend big bucks on their companions — not just dogs, but cats and other small animals, too.

    Norma Rash is one of those. 

    She has three dogs and one cat — she calls the dogs “the boys” and admits they are spoiled rotten.

    “Nothing is too much for the boys,” she said.

  • Concert series complements New Harmonies exhibit

    The Oldham County History Center will host New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music March 1 through April 21.

    This exhibit is part of the Museum on Main Streets program that is a partnership between the Kentucky Humanities Council and the Smithsonian Institute.  

    New Harmonies is a cultural history of America’s musical landscape. It’s the story of a diverse assortment of people interacting with a new world, where cultures and customs met, mixed, mingled and created new sounds.  

  • Carrying a concealed weapon is becoming more common in Oldham County

    First in a three-part series.
    Part one | Part two | Part three.

    If there was ever a reason to be nice to a stranger, this might be it: more Oldham Countians are permitted to carry concealed weapons.

  • Parents criticize Oldham County Schools' severe weather plans

    As nearby areas spend the weekend repairing and cleaning storm damage, many Oldham County parents are wondering why school officials kept students in school Friday afternoon.

    In an email sent to South Oldham Middle School parents through the One Call emergency notification system, Principal Rob Clayton said students would not be dismissed early.

    “Our thought is that students are safer at school and dismissing early would put younger students at home without parents to meet them,” Clayton wrote.

  • Bourbon and Fire

    He runs into the firehouse, suit jacket flapping, tidy hair blown backward. 

    Within seconds, he reemerges, clothes changed, like Superman.

    Then Wes Henderson jumps on a South Oldham Fire truck, on his way to help with another run.

    But Henderson isn’t your average volunteer firefighter.

  • GINGER: My love will linger on, always

    Twenty-one years ago, when hubby and I were planning our wedding, I wasn’t really sure how to go about choosing songs. I knew I didn’t want recorded music, but finding sheet music was a bit difficult.
    Back in those days, we didn’t have the benefit of Googling the lyrics.
     We have never really had a song that we refer to as “our song.” Our song changes with each stage of our relationship. When we first began dating, we listened to a lot of Roger Miller.

  • BOB MUELLER: Open your mind

    Native Kentuckian Abraham Lincoln has always been my favorite president. I have read countless books and articles about his universal empathy. Lincoln demonstrated time and time again “a singular ability to transcend personal vendetta, humiliation or bitterness.”
    Emulating Lincoln’s magnanimous empathy is not easy. The key to developing the same open-mindedness in ourselves is to start small.
    If people make you angry, instead of immediately spouting off, put yourself in their shoes.
    Why are they behaving the way they are?