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Local News

  • Metro United Way heads to state Capitol for Live United Day

     

  • This Week In Brief: March 11, 2015

    Horse Health Seminar
    Oldham County Extension is offering a free Horse Health Seminar on March 26 at 6:30 p.m. at the Extension Office.  Local equine veterinarian Dr. Jeff Willard will discuss recommended vaccinations and parasite control at this free seminar.  Call 222-9453 to register. 

  • PRESS RELEASE: Baptist Health volunteer program president retires

    The Era recieved a marvelous press release about a local resident who spent 18 years as a hospital volunteer before recently retiring. We present it here in full for our readers. 

     

    When Alta Haunsz decided to go to nursing school in 1948, she probably didn’t expect to be actively involved in a hospital setting 67 years later, but she wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • PRESS RELEASE: Apple Patch receives funds, recognition

    A Crestwood organization dedicated to serving individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities garnered attention in the halls of the state Capitol last Friday.

    On Mar. 6, the organization Apple Patch received its charitable contribution from the Prospect Chamber of Commerce and the formal recognition before the state Senate chamber in Frankfort via Sen. Ernie Harris. R- Prospect.

  • Bevin seeks support from Oldham Co. GOP women

    During what has become a neck and neck race for the nomination among Republican would-be’s for the Kentucky governor’s mansion, the Oldham County GOP Women’s Club heard from candidate Matt Bevin on Tuesday.

    Bevin joined the group to discuss his position on families, military service, Right to Work legislation, and women’s issues.

    “This War on Women argument is an unfair argument,” he said, accusing the press of manufacturing gender inequality in Republican party politics.

  • Hospital garden hopes for second year harvest

     

    Baptist Health La Grange’s Genesis Garden exceeded its expectations in its first year of growth of providing easy access to healthier food options to patients and those in the community suffering with chronic disease.

    After a Community Needs Assessment in 2012, residents in Oldham, Trimble and Henry counties reported that obesity, heart disease, stroke and cancer are leading health problems with the top six risky health behaviors falling into two categories: substance abuse and nutrition/weight issues.

  • Head Family Museum suffers damage after heavy precipitation

    The Oldham County Historical Society announced last week that the Peyton Samuel Head Family Museum, part of the Oldham County History Center campus, will be temporarily closed for repairs of damage caused by recent weather conditions.

    The museum was founded in 1998, but the building, located on the corner of North 2nd and West Jefferson Streets, dates back to 1840 and is in need of immediate repairs that make it unsafe for visitors at this time, according to Dr. Nancy Stearns Theiss, Executive Director of the Oldham County History Center.

  • Right to Work moves forward in Fiscal Court

    Right to Work legislation may have failed in Kentucky’s state legislature but advocates of the measure are pushing for local level passage in Oldham and other counties across the state.

    Just as vocal advocates of the bill were given opportunity to show their support during a previous meeting, voices opposing the measure got their chance to speak out At the Mar. 3 meeting of the Oldham County Fiscal Court.

  • The Last Bitter Blast

    In the last week Oldham County staggered under the wieght of nearly 14 inches of snow during an encore performance of the previous week’s paralyzing snowfall.

    The snow damaged trees, homes, cars and roads, say county officials.

    John Black, head of the Snow Removal Department spoke about the difficulties of the week’s weather battles.

    During his interview with the Oldham Era, Black demonstrated another problem with heavy snowfall in the region when his second phone rang.

  • Adult day care shifts gears for local clients

     

    Tri-County Community Action has served seniors for more than 25 years in Oldham, Trimble and Henry Counties, but after the Kentucky Office of Aging changed its standards last year, the non-profit agency located in La Grange was afraid it would have to shut its doors to the adult day care program.

    Instead, though, the program opted to transition from a social model to a medical model adult day care and this would require some changes around the already-existing facility.