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Local News

  • 'Mentally ill' individual puts two Oldham County schools into lockdown

    Two Oldham County High Schools were put on lockdown Thursday after Oldham County Police became aware of a situation involving a former student and current OCS student, police and school officials said. 

    Oldham County High School and North Oldham High School were put in seperate lockdowns Thursday morning. OCHS was put into lockdown first at 9:30 a.m., while NOHS went into lockdown at 10:30 a.m., Oldham County Schools Communications Director Tracy Harris said. Both schools were released from lockdown at 11 a.m., she said.

  • Proposed Walmart in Crestwood before Planning Commission

    A proposal to build a new Walmart in Crestwood is set to go over its first legislative hurdle next week.

    On Tuesday at 9 a.m., the Oldham County Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing and vote on two items related to the proposed new location on Veterans Memorial Parkway/Ky. 329 Bypass.

    The planning commission will decide whether to re-zone the area Walmart is proposing to build on from C-2 and C-3 to C-4, highway service. It will also decide whether to approve the development plan for the new store.

  • Marker sought for black cementery

     

    A walk down Third Street in La Grange will bring you to a plot of land rich with history.

    The La Grange Historic African-American Cemetery is the final resting place for 115 people, according to the cemetery’s plot chart. Notable people dating back to the days of slavery are buried in the land where Third and Fourth Streets meet.

    With February being Black History month, the Oldham County Historical Society is applying for a historical marker that will be placed outside the gates of the cemetery next February if approved.

  • Nay remembered as Oldham County icon

     

    Wallace “Wally” Nay was an avid gardener, lover of ice cream, driving enthusiast and all-around good guy according to his friends. Known as “Sugar” to his wife, Nay was a father, husband and Oldham County icon.

    Nay passed away on Feb. 7 at the age of 79, surrounded by family at his home in La Grange. He was laid to rest in the Valley of Rest Cemetery.

    Nay was probably best known for his civic service to Oldham County and the city of La Grange, according to longtime friend Jean Knight.

  • A taste of community
  • Event set to discuss heroin effects in the community

    A coalition made up of school, criminal justice and health professionals is hosting a forum to increase awareness of heroin in Oldham and surrounding counties.

    Heroin Hits Home: Our Community’s Response will take place on Thursday, March 6 at 6 p.m. in the North Oldham High School Auditorium.

    Presented by the Coalition for a Healthy Oldham County, the community event will feature a panel including an addiction specialist, law enforcement, District Judge Jerry Crosby and others. Court of Appeals Judge Allison Jones will moderate the panel.

  • The bear necessities

    St. Francis School would like to congratulate the cast and crew of 2014, 4th grade production of “The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling.

  • History brought to life

    Norb Rawert of The Sons of the American Revolution was invited to Camden Station Elementary School in Crestwood on Feb. 12. The presentation to Ms. Rene Larkin’s 5th grade class was a discussion of the Revolutionary War (1776-1783).

  • Grimes campaigns in Henry County, promoting women and farmers

    By Brad bowman

    LANDMARK NEWS SERVICE

    Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes came to Henry County Monday and told local officials, farmers and attendees she will make prosperity her priority for women and Kentucky farmers.

    Accompanied by U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-Michigan), the first female senator in Michigan, Grimes spoke with a bit of wit and grit about her vision if elected as Kentucky’s first female senator, and her opponent U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell.

  • Band director seeks used instruments

    A local middle school band director is asking the community to help another band in need.

    Robert Parker, band director at South Oldham Middle School, is collecting band instruments to send to a new program in Fulton County, in far western Kentucky.

    Parker is following up on a plea by Stephanie Mora, the teacher tasked with restarting a band program that was terminated due to budget cuts roughly seven years ago.