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Local News

  • Fresh face vs. experience in district new to Oldham County

    Voters in southwest Oldham County will choose between a fresh face with experience as a non-profit attorney and a former doctor and 22-year veteran of the Kentucky House of Representatives when they hit the voting booths this fall.

    Thanks to redistricting, a handful of precincts in Briar Hill, Orchard Grass Hills and surrounding areas are now represented by House District 48, which encompasses mostly northeast Jefferson County.

  • Coalition lands drug-free grant from the White House

    A wide-ranging coalition has been awarded federal money to help combat drug use in Oldham County.

    The Coalition for a Healthy Oldham County, a collaborative team made up of the Oldham County Health Department, area police departments, Our Lady of Peace of Louisville and many more community organizations, was awarded a federal grant by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy to help make Oldham County a drug-free community.

  • La Grange businessman recognized by trade publication

     

    A La Grange businessman is being recognized for making waves as vice president of his company.

    Early in his career, Ben Bowman is already the vice president of Parts Unlimited based IN La Grange, and was also recently selected as “35 under 35” by the Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA).

    Bowman joined PUI, an offshoot of SEMA, in 2010, where he was hired to globalize the restoration company.

  • Courthouse Square project begins quickly

    A historic re-do of part of the courthouse square is already underway.

    The Oldham County Fiscal Court approved the Courthouse Square Boulevard Project last week, including spending $107,000 out of the county’s parks budget to complete the project.

    The project will widen the current sidewalk closest to Main Street in downtown La Grange, as well as include brick pavers and new hardscape seating, County Judge-Executive David Voegele said.

  • Safety Festival adds new features to annual event

    One of Oldham County’s largest Halloween events is celebrating its fifth year, while increasing its focus on safety.

    Oldham County’s Largest Halloween and Safety Festival, organized by the La Grange Fire Department, will take place Oct. 4 from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Oldham County Fairgrounds.

    Chris Smith, president of the La Grange Fire Auxiliary, said this year’s festival would feature even more safety aspects from different organizations than in the past.

  • Domestic violence focus of St. James’ forum

     

    Domestic violence is not just a family issue, it’s an epidemic that has affected almost everyone. One in three women in the state of Kentucky will be the victim of domestic violence in her lifetime, according to the Kentucky Domestic Violence Association.

    Even in an area considered “safe” by most, Oldham County is not excluded from the high numbers, according to Rev. Dr. Mary Abrams of the St. James’ Episcopal Church in Pewee Valley.

  • Gas line explosion disturbs Goshen

     The rupturing of a gas line in Goshen has caused traffic backups and outages for more than 2,000 people for several days.

    A gas line explosion off U.S. 42 injured three LG&E subcontractors on Sept. 17. Residents and witnesses reported an explosion and a dust cloud with evidence of what amounted to a low order explosion with no fire around 5 p.m., according to Don Dahl, North Oldham Fire Protection District Assistant Chief.

  • Judges, clerks excited for new e-filing system

    Neighboring counties Oldham, Henry and Trimble will help test out a new electronic filing system for the state’s court system, area judges announced last week.

    The three counties make up the 12th Circuit in Kentucky, which is only the third circuit in the state to launch e-filing for civic cases, District Judge Jerry Crosby said.

    The new program will allow court clerks to enter motions, filings and other legal documents electronically, allowing for the start of a transition away from expensive paper costs, he said.

  • Crestwood Civic celebrates 100 years

    Not many organizations can say they have served a community for a whole century, but the Crestwood Civic Club will be among those few when it celebrates 100 years in Oldham County this weekend.

    The Commonwealth of Kentucky incorporated the club in November 1914 with the desire of its members to make the community a better and safer place to live.

    In 100 years, the club has promoted charitable, education and religious endeavors, including Apple Patch, American Red Cross and Girl Scouts.

  • ‘Thriller’ dance troupe excited for new season, needs new studio

     

    For the Terpsichore Dance Company, Halloween is a year-round event.

    It’s the 14th season of performing the choreographed Thriller dance at the Baxter Avenue Morgue Haunted House for the Crestwood-based troupe, where they entertain over 15,000 people each year.

    Carolyne Tilford created Terpsichore 16 years ago to give dancers from ages 10 to 55 a chance to learn choreographed dances and perform in the community.

    The Terpsichore dancers teach and perform year-round, but Thriller and the Halloween season are the biggest for them.