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Government

  • Officials reach agreement for Brownsboro sewers

    Extending sewers to the future Brownsboro school campus is now in the hands of the Oldham County Environmental Authority after fiscal court approved a revised interlocal agreement Jan. 17.

    The agreement between fiscal court, the city of Crestwood and Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District hasn’t been revised since its original signing in 1996.

  • Clerk, sheriff predict higher revenue in 2012

    Fiscal Court voted to approve 2012 budgets for the county clerk and sheriff’s offices on Jan. 3.

    County Clerk Julie Barr told the court projected gross income figures are 4.5 percent higher than in 2011, including increases in mortgage recordings, security agreements and power of attorney filings.

    However, about 90 percent of that income is distributed to other entities, like the school board, county attorney and state government.

  • La Grange man files for U.S. representative seat

    A La Grange resident is entering the race for the U.S. congressional seat being vacated by Rep. Geoff Davis.

    Brian Oerther, a conservative Republican who teaches math for Jefferson County Public Schools, is the third candidate for the position.

    Republicans are filing for the election after Davis, a four-term Republican congressman, announced Dec. 15 he will not run again in 2012 for the 4th Congressional district. Davis said he wants to devote more time to his family.

  • Longtime firefighter marks the end of 2011 with retirement

    He started his career in emergency response as a 14-year-old.  This weekend, more than 35 years later, Crestwood resident Mark Gardner marks the end of 2011 with his retirement from the South Oldham Fire Department. 

    Gardner, who most recently served as deputy chief of SOFD, retired Dec. 31.

    In his many years in the fire service, Gardner has also served as a training officer and as an EMT.

    Gardner said he was 14 when he and his best friend, Jeff Tanselle, walked into the Pewee Valley fire station and signed on as junior firefighters.

  • Sen. Ernie Harris previews Tuesday's start of General Assembly

    FRANKFORT – As most of you are aware, the 2012 Session of the Kentucky General Assembly will gavel in at noon Jan. 3. 

    Being an even-numbered year, this is considered a long session because legislators will be developing the two-year budget for the state.
     
    Much has been made of the fiscal challenges that lay ahead for your legislators.  Our tight budget situation has not been overstated, and only through prudent and practical measures will we be able to craft a responsible bi-annual budget. 

  • Lions Club donates land to county, library

    Ownership of Belknap Community Park, a 25-acre “green space” on Hwy. 42, officially transferred from the North Oldham Lions Club to the Oldham County Fiscal Court this week. 

    Six acres will go to Oldham County Public Library, said Bob Leslie, magistrate for District 3 and chair of the county’s park committee.

    “This is a win-win situation for Oldham County and our library,” Leslie said, noting that there is not a publicly-owned park in the northwest part of the county.

  • Officials will meet with Five Forks residents to discuss paving

    DATE:  December 13

    TIME:  7 p.m.

    LOCATION:   Pewee Valley City Hall Meeting Room

    HOSTED BY:  5th District Magistrate, JD Sparks & Oldham County Fiscal Court

    All are welcome, but officials hope to attract all Five Forks Drive property owners.

    There will be a meeting regarding the paving of Five Forks Drive and associated costs.

  • Task Force ‘like a boat without a rudder’

    After three meetings, members of the Fire and EMS Task Force remain unsure of their purpose.

    “We’re like a boat without a rudder,” said committee member Albert Harrison. 

    Judge-Executive David Voegele formed the committee in July and tasked members with determining if the current fire and EMS models are the most effective and efficient.

  • Inmate labor fuels county government

    They’re behind the scenes, staffing the recycling center, cutting grass and stringing Christmas lights. They’re polite, hardworking and hard to miss in their orange shirts.

    These county jail inmates do a lot of work around Oldham County as part of the jail’s work detail program. Inmates logged more than 29,700 hours of work from January to August this year.

  • Planning officials criticized for open records violations

    Two rulings for open records law violations by county government were released in early November.

    Oldham County resident Judy Ponder filed the open records appeals with the Office of the Attorney General in September.

    Ponder asserted the county engineer and planning and development office both failed to fulfill records requests.

    State law requires public agencies to determine within three business days if an open records request will be granted. If denied, the agency is required to send notification of why.