.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Government

  • Judges explain state laws allowing early releases

    Frustrated by a judicial system that seems to result in a revolving door for at least one specific criminal in their town, Pewee Valley City Council members asked for an explanation.

    At their monthly meeting Monday night, council members heard from 12th Judicial District Judges Jerry Crosby and Diana Wheeler, who serve Oldham, Henry and Trimble Counties. The judges fielded questions from council members and provided a description of the criminal release process as it relates to House Bill 463.

  • ‘Mayor for life’ to be honored

     It can be hard to run anything by yourself, let alone a city, but that is what Crestwood Mayor Dennis Deibel has been doing since 1972. He is the mayor, clerk and accountant of a city that has exploded in population recently. All calls to the city go directly to his cell phone.

    “I believe that the smaller the government the better,” Deibel said. His government in Crestwood is about as small as it can get.

  • Planning and Zoning returns to old plan

     Oldham County’s planning and zoning commission has re-adopted a comprehensive plan previously passed in 2007.

    After Fiscal Court turned down the commission’s latest comprehensive plan, the county was left without a plan upon which to base decisions. Chairman Kevin Jeffries said the commission will continue to work on the new comprehensive plan but wanted to pass the old one so they could have working guidelines.

  • GOP groups celebrate growth at rally

     For the first time ever, five local Republican groups joined together to celebrate their growing political strength with the state’s top GOP officials.

    The Republican parties of Henry, Oldham, Trimble, Carroll and Shelby joined together last Friday for the first ever Multi-County GOP Picnic, drawing U.S. Sens. Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul as headliners.

    Congressman Thomas Massie and Agriculture Commissioner James Comer joined the state’s two U.S. senators at the event, in addition to dozens of local officials from the five counties.

  • Fiscal Court Briefs

    Oldham County Fiscal Court approved two new board members during their meeting on Sept. 3.

    Judge-Executive David Voegele appointed Samuel Finney to the County Planning and Zoning Commission Board with a term to expire in September of 2017.

    Finney comes in at a crucial time with the fate of the comprehensive plan in question and a future zoning overhaul for the county on the horizon.

    Voegele also added Sallie Haynes to the Oldham County Library Board with a term to expire in October of 2017.

  • Judge Jones Sworn In

    Last week Allison Jones took her official oath, being sworn in as the new Kentucky Court of Appeals Judge for the 6th Appellate District, Division 1, which includes Oldham County. 

    Elected officials and judges from across the state gathered in the Campbell County Courthouse in Newport to celebrate Jones’ investiture as the newest member of Kentucky’s Appellate Court. 

    Judge Jones, who has decided to locate her office in Campbell County, replaces current Kentucky Supreme Court Justice Michelle Keller, who swore her in.

  • OC Water District Receives State Honor

    The Oldham County Water District has received the highest award given to rural water districts in Kentucky.

    The district is the 2013 recipient of the Kentucky Rural Water Association’s Wooden Bucket Award, which is given to a water or wastewater utility that has made “substantial and lasting improvements in providing high levels of customer service,” as well as increased quality of their operations, according to the association.

  • City passes Ad Valorum Tax

    La Grange City Council met Sept. 3 for the first time after passing the compensation tax and discovering an error in the amount the city was paying for employee's health insurance.

    After having large turnouts for the past few meetings with a compensation tax and incorporation on the table, this meeting was lightly attended.

    The city approved a renewal of an Ad Valorum tax during the meeting, passing it unanimously. Mayor Bill Lammlein said the rates are not increasing and have not for a few years.

  • JUDGE WANTS TO BE PUBLIC SERVANT

    Court of Appeals Judge Allison Jones wants to be an active judge, but not in the way most think.

    Being called an “activist judge” usually comes with a negative connotation but Jones wants to flip that idea upside down.

    “I take my role as a public servant very seriously,” Jones said. “I want to do more as a Court of Appeals judge than rule on cases.”

  • County redistricted, representatives increased

    Oldham County’s representation has increased to four in the Kentucky House of Representatives, but it will come at the expense of splitting up the southwest portion of the county.

    Three Louisville-based House districts shoot up into Oldham County and will split Pewee Valley and Crestwood into separate districts.