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Government

  • Traffic system being developed

    The Oldham County Fiscal Court is in the process of potentially approving a system to alert local drivers to interstate backups and delays.

    The idea, first brought up by County Judge-Executive David Voegele months ago, would provide local drivers the decision to divert to other local roads if a wreck delays or shuts down Interstate 71.

    The problem is that no such system currently exists… yet.

  • County will consider right to work ordinance

    After weeks of consideration, the Oldham County Fiscal Court is planning to move forward with a right to work ordinance, while talking to surrounding counties about joining them.

    The Oldham Fiscal Court had a first reading of the measure at its meeting Wednesday, which was rescheduled due to weather. Such an ordinance would forbid unions from forcing employees to pay union dues whether they want to or not. Critics of the idea call it “right to work for less” because they claim it would lower union membership, thereby hampering collective bargaining.

  • Bridge Hill construction begins

    Six years after its initial planning, the reconstruction of Bridge Hill will begin this week.

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet announced the restructuring of KY 22 between Veterans Memorial Parkway and Abbott Lane, nicknamed the Bridge Hill project, will begin this week after a bid was awarded and easement payments completed.

  • Fiscal Court donation helps seal new Carrollton campus

    The Oldham County Fiscal Court is authorizing more than $100,000 of its funds over the next three years to help build a new community college building in Carrollton.

    The Fiscal Court approved pledging $120,000 over three years to the new Carrollton campus project of Jefferson Community and Technical College at its Feb. 3 meeting.

    “The financial committee feel like we can support it and we should support it,” Magistrate Wayne Theiss said. “We felt like it would be good for us and good for them.”

  • County to consider right to work law

    Already an issue statewide, Oldham County could possibly become the next county to pass a so-called right to work ordinance, following six other counties’ lead.

    The issue involves whether workers should be forced to pay union fees, if they are unionized where they work, whether they join a union or not. Currently, workers at a unionized workplace all pay union fees, because the unions collectively bargain for all employees.

  • Ground broken for new OCEA plant

     

    The Oldham County Environmental Authority, the Oldham County Fiscal Court and others celebrated the beginning of construction of the South Oldham Regional Facility last week in a groundbreaking ceremony in Crestwood.

    The facility is OCEA’s third regional wastewater treatment facility. The construction of the state-of-the-art facility is the culmination of a regionalization plan the authority has been implementing since 2010, according to Vicki Miller, community relations manager for OCEA, which is operated by Veolia.

  • OCPD asks for change to alarm ordinance

    The Oldham County Fiscal Court is set to consider changes to its alarm ordinance in roughly a month.

    Currently, the ordinance gives homeowners a three strikes policy on false alarms before receiving a citation and fine from the county code enforcement board. But those strikes only count during a calendar year, resetting each Jan. 1.

    With Oldham County Police and the Oldham County Sheriff’s Office still fielding more than 800 false alarm runs a year, OCPD Chief Greg Smith is petitioning the Fiscal Court for a change in the ordinance.

  • Backyard Politics: Rand's plans unveiled, state candidates vetted and county leadership put to the test at Oldham County GOP Women's Club

    Eager to piggyback on an expected wave of statewide Republican momentum, the Oldham County Republican Women’s Club will be sponsoring a gubernatorial debate among all four Republican candidates--Matt Bevin, James Comer, Hal Heiner and Will Scott--on Tuesday, April 7.

    The same day, U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky, is expected to announce his decision to run for the U.S. presidency in 2016.

  • Sewer group recommends no major changes

    By TOM BARR

    LANDMARK NEWS SERVICE

    LOUISVILLE -- While a luxury car might be preferred, a consulting firm looking at possible sewer facilities in a tri-county area has recommended something similar to what is now being driven.

    Strand Associates Inc. made its recommendation to members of the Salt River Regional Wastewater work group last week.

  • Fiscal Court creates new committee

     

    A handful of Oldham County magistrates will add economic development to their focus for the upcoming term.

    At the last Fiscal Court meeting, County Judge-Executive David Voegele announced the formation of a new committee focusing on economic development in Oldham County.

    The Economic Development Committee will work with the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development to bring new employment and economic opportunity to the county, Voegele said.