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Government

  • County to consider right to work law

    Already an issue statewide, Oldham County could possibly become the next county to pass a so-called right to work ordinance, following six other counties’ lead.

    The issue involves whether workers should be forced to pay union fees, if they are unionized where they work, whether they join a union or not. Currently, workers at a unionized workplace all pay union fees, because the unions collectively bargain for all employees.

  • Ground broken for new OCEA plant

     

    The Oldham County Environmental Authority, the Oldham County Fiscal Court and others celebrated the beginning of construction of the South Oldham Regional Facility last week in a groundbreaking ceremony in Crestwood.

    The facility is OCEA’s third regional wastewater treatment facility. The construction of the state-of-the-art facility is the culmination of a regionalization plan the authority has been implementing since 2010, according to Vicki Miller, community relations manager for OCEA, which is operated by Veolia.

  • OCPD asks for change to alarm ordinance

    The Oldham County Fiscal Court is set to consider changes to its alarm ordinance in roughly a month.

    Currently, the ordinance gives homeowners a three strikes policy on false alarms before receiving a citation and fine from the county code enforcement board. But those strikes only count during a calendar year, resetting each Jan. 1.

    With Oldham County Police and the Oldham County Sheriff’s Office still fielding more than 800 false alarm runs a year, OCPD Chief Greg Smith is petitioning the Fiscal Court for a change in the ordinance.

  • Sewer group recommends no major changes

    By TOM BARR

    LANDMARK NEWS SERVICE

    LOUISVILLE -- While a luxury car might be preferred, a consulting firm looking at possible sewer facilities in a tri-county area has recommended something similar to what is now being driven.

    Strand Associates Inc. made its recommendation to members of the Salt River Regional Wastewater work group last week.

  • New members make La Grange council stand out

    It happened on Jan. 5, with very little fanfare.

    Those involved showed up between 15 and 30 minutes early, but there were no parties, no special recognition, nothing to note the occasion. To be honest, several of those involved didn’t even realize what happened.

    But at 6:31 p.m. on Jan. 5, the La Grange City Council became the first, and only, legislative body in Oldham County populated by a majority of women.

  • Chamber hosts Frankfort preview

     

    The Oldham Chamber and Economic Development will bring together business leaders and legislators to ensure better economic conditions in Oldham County later this month.

    On Jan. 22, the Oldham Chamber will host a legislative preview panel to discuss important legislative issues impacting business throughout the Commonwealth.

    “One of the most important things a Chamber can do is represent its businesses on important public policy issues,” Deana Epperly Karem, Executive Director of Oldham Chamber and Economic Development, said.

  • Fiscal Court creates new committee

     

    A handful of Oldham County magistrates will add economic development to their focus for the upcoming term.

    At the last Fiscal Court meeting, County Judge-Executive David Voegele announced the formation of a new committee focusing on economic development in Oldham County.

    The Economic Development Committee will work with the Oldham Chamber and Economic Development to bring new employment and economic opportunity to the county, Voegele said.

  • Group works to reform area sewer facilities

    By tom barr

    LANDMARK NEWS SERVICE

    Coming up with a regional sewage treatment plan could be a very costly situation.

    But, on the other hand, it might be just as costly to do nothing.

    The second in a series of public meetings on the Salt River Watershed sewer work group was held recently in Louisville. The few who attended listened as engineers with Strand and Associates outlined some of the options and the costs.

    Bullitt, Jefferson and Oldham counties have the only agencies that are part of the work group.

  • Mayor taking things ‘one day at a time’

    With a new mayor and four new members of the council, things are likely to start slow when it comes to new legislation in La Grange, Mayor Joe Davenport said.

    The new council met for the first time Monday night, with Davenport, who spent 20 years as a councilman, in the mayor’s seat this time. Joining Davenport were first-time council members Shannon Pottie, Ann Zimlich, Stephanie Chalfant and Trey Kamer, as well as former mayor Bill Lammlein, who is now a councilman.

  • Pewee discusses 2015 goals

     

    It was just the first meeting of the year for the city council in Pewee Valley Monday, but the members were already prepared with ideas for the New Year.

    Council members agreed that they would like to focus most on the reformation of the Town Square.

    Mayor Bob Rogers said the biggest goal for the year would be trying to gain outside funding for the project.

    “We’re focusing our resources on the project,” Rogers said.