• Catholic high school placement test is Dec. 10

    Students in eighth grade who wish to attend a Catholic high school next year are required to take the Catholic high school placement test scheduled 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10. 

    Students take the test at the high school they plan to attend. They must bring a $10 fee and two No. 2 pencils. 

    The placement test helps Catholic secondary schools determine the most appropriate course work and academic path for meeting the needs of each student.

  • Fraudulent enrollment charges continue

    The latest charge in a string of Oldham County cases against falsified school enrollment was filed Friday.

    James Elliot, who lives near Ky. 146 and Factory Lane, is charged with falsely enrolling his child in South Oldham High School.

    Dan Orman, Assistant Superintendent of Student Services, said his office tried repeatedly to reach Elliot and even sent home a letter with the child.

    In fact, it was the student who provided the correct address to school administrators.

  • School raises $15,000 during annual auction

    St. Francis Preschool in Harrods Creek recently hosted the school's annual auction, The Palooza, at St. Francis in the Fields Episcopal Church.

    The event raised about $15,000 to benefit the school with dinner, a silent and a live auction.

  • Reading pays off

     It was Linnea Wieck’s lucky day. On Tuesday, she was presented with a $1,000 check. 

    Then again, 4-year-olds don’t think about money very often, which is OK since the money is in a college savings account she can use in 14 years.

  • Black and white and scanned all over

    Little black barcodes dot the Goshen Elementary library, where they’re taped to shelves, doors, desks and even book spines. 

    To the naked eye they just look like, well, barcodes. But scanned with a smart phone, the barcodes bring up text, videos and other information.

    They’re quick response codes — barcodes that can hold data for 4,300 alpha-numeric characters in one small square.

  • Brownsboro elementary changed to top district priority

    Plans to build a Brownsboro elementary inched forward Nov. 9 when the district’s local planning committee voted to make the project a top priority in the district facility plan.

    Committee members voted 18-2 to raise the Brownsboro school priority from 2a to 1b, a change school officials say will make about $1.9 million available in state funding previously restricted because of the prioritization.

  • South Oldham Middle in the running for $50K grant

    South Oldham Middle School hopes to gain a $50,000 grant from The Clorox Company to replace worn out computers and upgrade the school's technological infrastructure.

    Voting takes place now through Dec. 9.

    People 13 and older can vote online or text “clorox6642” to 44144.

    Standard messaging and data rates may apply.

  • Missed goals leave students at three Oldham schools eligible to transfer

    Students at three Oldham County schools are eligible for transfers to other Oldham schools after the schools failed to meet No Child Left Behind act goals for the 2010-2011 school year.

    Parents of students at Crestwood Elementary, Locust Grove Elementary and Oldham County Middle received letters recently regarding transfer eligibility.

    The transfers come after Adequate Yearly Progress reports were released by the Kentucky Department of Education in September. 

  • Officials question sewer service to new Brownsboro school

    There’s a new stink about the proposed Brownsboro school as officials debate who should provide sewer service to the property.

    Members of Oldham County Fiscal Court will now decide whether to extend its interlocal agreement to provide sewer service to the Brownsboro school campus.

    If the court decides not to provide sewer lines to the school, Crestwood Mayor Dennis Deibel said he’s prepared to annex the area into city limits and provide sewer service. 

  • Fake cigarettes banned at NOHS

    Electronic cigarettes have officially been banned at North Oldham High School, according to an email bulletin to parents Tuesday.

    Principal Lisa Jarrett said “e-Cigs” have been a topic of discussion for about four weeks.

    Jarrett was approached by a student and his parent about using electronic cigarettes in school as he attempts to quit smoking.