• Weekend weather fuels criticism

    It’s been a long weekend for members of the Oldham County Schools’ administration.

    Severe weather at the end of the school day Friday and late Sunday evening forced district officials to face multiple tough decisions about having schools open.

    Tornados touched down in Kentucky and Indiana Friday, killing at least 34 people and causing major damage to several towns.

  • Committee narrows superintendent search to a dozen applicants

      A new superintendent will be in place by July for Oldham County Schools.

    According to Kevin Woosley, the school board’s representative on a search committee, about a dozen candidates are still in the running. 

  • False enrollment charges continue for Lyndon dad

    A grand jury indicted one parent charged with falsely enrolling his son in Oldham County Schools last month.

    Charles Lauron, 51, is charged with owing the school district about $26,000 after enrolling his son in Oldham County Schools for eight years, despite living in Lyndon.

    Lauron’s co-defendant, Donna Claggett, has been cleared of any wrong-doing.

  • Parents criticize Oldham County Schools' severe weather plans

    As nearby areas spend the weekend repairing and cleaning storm damage, many Oldham County parents are wondering why school officials kept students in school Friday afternoon.

    In an email sent to South Oldham Middle School parents through the One Call emergency notification system, Principal Rob Clayton said students would not be dismissed early.

    “Our thought is that students are safer at school and dismissing early would put younger students at home without parents to meet them,” Clayton wrote.

  • St. Francis schools announce Goshen, Louisville campus merger

    Officials from the St. Francis School in Goshen and St. Francis High School in Louisville announced a merger between the two schools Feb. 22.
    The merged school will be called  St. Francis School. The new school is the only independent school in Louisville serving 2-year-olds through 12th graders.
    The high school will continue to operate at its downtown location, the lower and middle Schools will continue to be located in Goshen, and the preschool will continue to operate at its Harrods Creek location for the immediate future.

  • Defibrillator, school staff help save OCHS student's life

    A defibrillator and the quick work of Oldham County High School faculty saved a student’s life last week when 16-year-old Cole Gibson went into cardiac arrest.

    Principal Brent Deaves said Gibson, a junior, was in class when the incident occurred.

    Teacher Joan Thompson immediately called the office and reported a medical issue and Assistant Principal Stan Torzewski rushed to the classroom.

  • Autism Center serves adults in a child-centered industry

    A new project by Apple Patch is providing unique opportunities for adults with autism.

    The Autism Center at Apple Patch opened in early January in Crestwood Station and is at 50 percent capacity already, said Joe Spoelker, director of development and marketing.

  • These are your neighbors on drugs

    The statewide fight against prescription drugs hit close to home on Monday. 

    Just days after Attorney General Jack Conway spoke to North Oldham High School students about the dangers of prescription drugs, police raided a La Grange home suspected of trafficking.

    La Grange Police Chief Kevin Collett said the number of prescription drug-related crimes has dramatically increased in the past five years.

  • SOMS students possibly exposed to whooping cough

    According to a public health advisory sent out Friday, students at South Oldham Middle School may have been exposed to Bordetella pertussis — whooping cough — by a sixth-grade student at the school.

    Most children are protected from severe sickness by the tetnus/diptheria/pertussis, or TDAP, shot. However, the shot does not protect them from catching them germ and spreading it to others.

    Children who are behind on the TDAP series are at a higher risk for severe illness.

  • Pyramid Awards fund innovative teaching ideas

    Twenty-one Oldham County School teachers are being recognized for innovative and engaging ideas during the 2011 Pyramid Awards.

    The awards are given by the Oldham County Educational Foundation, a non-profit organization that raises funds to bridge the gaps in classroom funding.