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Education

  • Pyramid Awards fund innovative teaching ideas

    Twenty-one Oldham County School teachers are being recognized for innovative and engaging ideas during the 2011 Pyramid Awards.

    The awards are given by the Oldham County Educational Foundation, a non-profit organization that raises funds to bridge the gaps in classroom funding.

  • Dollars for Scholars now accepting applications

    

It's official!

    The Oldham County Dollars for Scholars application is now online at 
www.ocdfs.org.

    OCDFS is a non-profit organization and already has 56 local sponsors offering 79 scholarships ranging from $500 to $5,000 totaling $76,600.

    By submitting only one application, students can apply for multiple scholarships.

    Applications must be postmarked by March 1.

  • Veggies sprout in cafeterias

    School lunches have a bad rap in popular culture — cartoon lunch ladies serve up mystery meat, jiggly masses of who-knows-what and make it all look pretty unappealing.

    But in school cafeterias across Oldham County, students are served whole grains, roasted vegetables and lots of home-style cooking. 

    The school district is the county’s most prolific food franchise, with 17 locations.

  • Audit shows Oldham EMS overspending since 2008

    After a tumultuous year filled with changes at Oldham County EMS, an annual audit revealed the district’s expenses have surpassed revenues for the past three years.

    Fiscal court reviewed the audit at its Jan. 17 meeting.

    Stan Clark, county CFO and OCEMS board member, presented the audit.

  • Oldham students earn Reflections awards

    More than 150 students took the stage to receive awards at the PTA Reflections Celebration on Sunday.

    The program provides opportunities for students to express themselves and receive positive recognition for artistic efforts. 

    Students from preschool through 12th grade can participate in six areas including dance choreography, film production, literature, musical composition, photography and the visual arts.

  • Officials reach agreement for Brownsboro sewers

    Extending sewers to the future Brownsboro school campus is now in the hands of the Oldham County Environmental Authority after fiscal court approved a revised interlocal agreement Jan. 17.

    The agreement between fiscal court, the city of Crestwood and Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District hasn’t been revised since its original signing in 1996.

  • Prospect Latin School to host open houses

    Parents of prospective students are invited to attend open houses at Prospect Latin Preschool, 8907 U.S. 42, Prospect, on Jan. 25 and 26. 

    Open houses are scheduled 10:30-11:30 a.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25 and Thursday, Jan. 26.

    The independent, academic preschool offers a full-day and part-day year-round early childhood program for children ages 18 months to 5 years.

  • Educators see suspensions drop after altering treatment options for drug, alcohol offenders

    After a major spike in drug-and alcohol-related suspensions three years ago, Oldham County school officials developed a plan to reduce those numbers — and it’s working.

    Projections for this school year estimate the number of student suspensions will be half what they were in the 2008-09 school year, the year before the plan’s implementation. This school year there have been 23 suspensions, compared to 53 at the same time last year.

  • Upchurch announces retirement

    After 28 years in the Oldham County school district, Superintendent Paul Upchurch has announced he will retire in June.

    Upchurch announced his decision Monday during the board of education meeting.

    Upchurch became superintendent in 2005 after seven years leading the Elizabethtown Independent School District. Prior to Elizabethtown, Uphurch was both a teacher and principal for Oldham County Schools.

    One major factor in the timing of his retirement are the changes coming with Kentucky Senate Bill 1, Upchurch said. 

  • 13 Oldham teachers added to National Board Certified ranks

    Thirteen Oldham County teachers are now part of the National Board Certification ranks, a certification process synonymous with great teaching.

    While state teacher credentialing programs set the basic requirements to teach in each state, National Board Certified Teachers must demonstrate advanced teaching knowledge, skills and practices.