.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Education

  • Defibrillator, school staff help save OCHS student's life

    A defibrillator and the quick work of Oldham County High School faculty saved a student’s life last week when 16-year-old Cole Gibson went into cardiac arrest.

    Principal Brent Deaves said Gibson, a junior, was in class when the incident occurred.

    Teacher Joan Thompson immediately called the office and reported a medical issue and Assistant Principal Stan Torzewski rushed to the classroom.

  • Autism Center serves adults in a child-centered industry

    A new project by Apple Patch is providing unique opportunities for adults with autism.

    The Autism Center at Apple Patch opened in early January in Crestwood Station and is at 50 percent capacity already, said Joe Spoelker, director of development and marketing.

  • These are your neighbors on drugs

    The statewide fight against prescription drugs hit close to home on Monday. 

    Just days after Attorney General Jack Conway spoke to North Oldham High School students about the dangers of prescription drugs, police raided a La Grange home suspected of trafficking.

    La Grange Police Chief Kevin Collett said the number of prescription drug-related crimes has dramatically increased in the past five years.

  • SOMS students possibly exposed to whooping cough

    According to a public health advisory sent out Friday, students at South Oldham Middle School may have been exposed to Bordetella pertussis — whooping cough — by a sixth-grade student at the school.

    Most children are protected from severe sickness by the tetnus/diptheria/pertussis, or TDAP, shot. However, the shot does not protect them from catching them germ and spreading it to others.

    Children who are behind on the TDAP series are at a higher risk for severe illness.

  • Pyramid Awards fund innovative teaching ideas

    Twenty-one Oldham County School teachers are being recognized for innovative and engaging ideas during the 2011 Pyramid Awards.

    The awards are given by the Oldham County Educational Foundation, a non-profit organization that raises funds to bridge the gaps in classroom funding.

  • Dollars for Scholars now accepting applications

    

It's official!

    The Oldham County Dollars for Scholars application is now online at 
www.ocdfs.org.

    OCDFS is a non-profit organization and already has 56 local sponsors offering 79 scholarships ranging from $500 to $5,000 totaling $76,600.

    By submitting only one application, students can apply for multiple scholarships.

    Applications must be postmarked by March 1.

  • Veggies sprout in cafeterias

    School lunches have a bad rap in popular culture — cartoon lunch ladies serve up mystery meat, jiggly masses of who-knows-what and make it all look pretty unappealing.

    But in school cafeterias across Oldham County, students are served whole grains, roasted vegetables and lots of home-style cooking. 

    The school district is the county’s most prolific food franchise, with 17 locations.

  • Audit shows Oldham EMS overspending since 2008

    After a tumultuous year filled with changes at Oldham County EMS, an annual audit revealed the district’s expenses have surpassed revenues for the past three years.

    Fiscal court reviewed the audit at its Jan. 17 meeting.

    Stan Clark, county CFO and OCEMS board member, presented the audit.

  • Oldham students earn Reflections awards

    More than 150 students took the stage to receive awards at the PTA Reflections Celebration on Sunday.

    The program provides opportunities for students to express themselves and receive positive recognition for artistic efforts. 

    Students from preschool through 12th grade can participate in six areas including dance choreography, film production, literature, musical composition, photography and the visual arts.

  • Officials reach agreement for Brownsboro sewers

    Extending sewers to the future Brownsboro school campus is now in the hands of the Oldham County Environmental Authority after fiscal court approved a revised interlocal agreement Jan. 17.

    The agreement between fiscal court, the city of Crestwood and Louisville’s Metropolitan Sewer District hasn’t been revised since its original signing in 1996.