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Education

  • Republicans host candidate forum

    School board candidates had a chance to speak publicly at a forum last week, ahead of an important November election.

    Four of the five board seats are contested this year and many consider it an important time in Oldham County Schools’ history as construction is set to begin on Brownsboro Elementary and the district continues to tap into financial reserves to avoid raising taxes.

    Although school board positions are non-partisan, the Oldham County Republican Party hosted a forum for candidates Sept. 25.

  • Are they ready? College and career readiness the focus of 2009 standards now in effect

    College and career readiness is now a benchmark for high school students across the state, and local officials say Oldham County students are off to a good start.

    The new standards, part of Senate Bill 1 from 2009, are designed to increase college completion and job attainment for high school graduates.

  • Two-thirds of AP students in Oldham Co. pass exams

    Oldham County students passed more than 1,500 advanced placement exams in 2012, making them eligible to earn college credit before graduating high school.

    Students passed two-thirds of the 2,287 tests issued with a 3 or higher on the AP exams’ five-point scale.

    Most Kentucky public universities will accept a 3 or better for college credit.

  • 4 of 5 school board seats are contested in November election

    Presidential and congressional candidates are dominating the airways this election season, but expect to see signs cropping up for candidates for local offices as the Nov. 6 election approaches.

    The deadline for candidates to file for the general election was Aug. 14.

    Four of the five Oldham County Board of Education seats are contested, and no candidate is running unopposed.

  • Oldham's graduation rates slip

    Oldham County Schools graduation rates fell last year, according to a report released last week by the Kentucky Department of Education.

    But district administrators said the number doesn’t accurately reflect graduation rates because of a change in the way rates are calculated.

    Oldham County’s district-wide graduation rate for 2010-11 fell to 85.6 percent — falling nearly 3 percentage points from 2009-10.

  • Despite $220,000 deficit, school board keeps tax rate

     School district tax rates will remain the same, despite a $220,000 projected deficit.

    Oldham County Board of Education members unanimously agreed Aug. 10 to keep the current rate of 68.9 cents per $100 of property value.

    Retaining the current rate will cause the district’s revenue to be $219,000 less than the 2012-13 estimated budget, said Randy Davis, the district’s assistant chief financial officer.

  • Program designed to boost reading skills

    More than 40 Oldham County teachers hit the books Friday as part of the district’s new Reading Academy.

    The two-semester program was designed in conjunction with Bellarmine University and will improve teacher understanding and capabilities in reading instruction, said Amy Grimm, the district’s intervention coach.

    Grimm’s focus is on improving reading skills across the district through the new academy and other programs.

  • Superintendent will earn $157K

    The contract for new school Superintendent Will Wells shows a salary similar to the previous superintendent’s starting salary but with little leeway for increases.

    Wells signed a four-year contract this summer with the Oldham County Board of Education for $157,500 annually.

    When former superintendent Paul Upchurch took over the district in 2005, his starting salary was $137,500 — about $161,500 when adjusted for inflation. 

  • Teachers receive half-percent raise from county

    School district officials announced last week that — despite their preliminary budget — teachers will be getting a raise in the fall.

    Superintendent Will Wells, who began his new position July 1, listed teacher compensation as a top priority during the superintendent hiring process.

    Now, district officials have decided to dip into a contingency fund to offer an additional .5 percent raise.

  • New summer program targets high-achievers

    School district officials hope to continue raising the educational bar in Oldham County through a selective summer program.

    The Oldham County Student Scholars program launched this summer under the guidance of Jackie Howell, the district’s secondary gifted and talented educational services coordinator.