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City News

  • Relocation forces city to pick interim mayor

    An unforeseen relocation has led to a time of transition in one Oldham County city.

    Former Orchard Grass Hills Mayor Darlene Yarberry resigned her office at the town’s October meeting, due to her family moving to Mississippi.  At that same meeting, the city’s six council members elected one of their own to be interim mayor until Yarberry’s term ends in December 2014. 

    Interim Mayor Doug Lalli has been on the job roughly one month, after spending three years on the Orchard Grass Hill’s city council.

  • Railroad and Bluegrass Festival This Weekend

    Discover Downtown LaGrange will host its 4th Annual La Grange Railroad and Bluegrass Festival this weekend in historic downtown LaGrange. Admission is free to the public and will feature a variety of downtown activities including music entertainment Friday night and throughout the day Saturday, Farmer’s Market, Model Train and Toy Swap Meet, kid’s miniature train rides, workshops, a cardboard box train parade, and two first time events, the La Grange Railroad Festival Beauty Pageant and Club Car Invitational Cornhole Tournament.

  • Lawsuit with Former Mayor Settled

     

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    The City of La Grange settled its lawsuit against former mayor Elsie Carter almost three years after she left office.

  • Prospect-ive Growth and Progress

     

  • Pewee Valley opens new park

     After roughly seven years of work, Pewee Valley’s Central Park officially opened Sunday with a concert and dedication.

    The park, located behind Pewee Valley City Hall, features a walking path, gazebo and mural of an old stone mill, painted by local artist Carol Logan with help from Emily Mintman, a Pewee Valley resident.

    Sunday’s dedication included music from local band Whiskey Bent Valley, as well as brief remarks from Mayor Bob Rogers.

  • Street Closure

    On Saturday, Sept. 14, Main Street in La Grange will be closed between First Street and Walnut Street from 8am to 6pm for Antiques & Primitives on the Track. Vendors will be setting up booths along Main Street. For more information, please contact Nancy Griffin, director of Discover Downtown La Grange, at 502-269-0126.

  • Mural enhances Pewee Valley Park

    Local artists Carole Logan and Emily Mintman have just completed the mural of the old stone mill on the back of Pewee Valley Town Hall facing Central Park. The actual stonemill is also on display. The mural, stonemill and newly installed waterfall feature are part of the continuing development and enhancement of Central Park. Pewee Valley resident Paula Kennedy voluntarily coordinates the park development.

  • History Center installs fountain

    A new sculpture and rock fountain are in the process of being installed at the Oldham County History Center campus, located at 106 N. Second Ave., La Grange. 

    It is dedicated to Louise Head Duncan, a lifelong resident of Oldham County.  Through her generosity, Mrs. Duncan provided a local trust, the Peyton Samuel Head Trust, that has funded many projects benefiting Oldham Countians, including the Oldham County History Center.

  • Ordinance addresses abandoned homes

    In an effort to make the city of La Grange safer and more appealing, the city council adopted a new ordinance regarding abandoned properties.

    Any creditor or lender will now be responsible for maintaining the appearance of any abandoned house. If the lender does not want to deal with upkeep they can turn the house over to the city. The new ordinance is designed to create a more complete listing of abandoned properties in La Grange.

    This new law can’t be put into effect soon enough for Pat Giles, who lives next to an abandoned house in Washington Manor.

  • La Grange tax passed; effective Oct. 1

    After months of discussion, public outcry and heated debate, the La Grange city council voted 6-1 in favor to impose a compensation tax for the city.

    Council voted down a similar measure last month, but, claiming this was the only way to raise money to pay off the city’s massive debt, Mayor Bill Lammlein reintroduced the tax for a first reading during a special meeting last week. That allowed council to hold the second reading Monday.