.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Raise a Glass: Voters approve alcohol at Yew Dell

    It will be easier for patrons of a popular Crestwood event center to consume alcohol, thanks to the results of a special election.

    The election, held Tuesday at the South Oldham Fire Station on Old La Grange road, will now allow Yew Dell Botanical Gardens to sell alcohol by the drink during events. The change was passed by an 87 percent margin.

    Yew Dell is host to many business events and weddings year-round, but previously could only make alcohol available by hiring a licensed caterer to provide it.

  • Businessman elected to new hall of fame

     

    Jerry McCandless typically isn’t seen.

    Whether it’s his business, often represented by “guys in white suits” cleaning up after traffic accidents or his work in higher education, McCandless typically eludes the spotlight.

    But in March, McCandless will be center stage as one of 27 inductees into the new Kentucky Veteran’s Hall of Fame, located in Frankfort.

  • Kroger Grand Re-Opening
  • News briefs Jan. 9

    Group gets tax status

    The group Friends of Pewee Valley officially received their 501(c)(3) status from the Internal Revenue Service. This status makes them an official tax exempt non-profit organization. Mayor Bob Rogers announced at January’s city council meeting that the Friends applied for the status in February of 2011 and just recently received notification of acceptance.

    Comprehensive plan passed

  • New Farm Bureau area program director named

    Louisville – David S. Beck, Executive Vice President of Kentucky Farm Bureau Federation, announced today that Stacy Lowe, a Flemingsburg native, has been named Area Program Director for Area 3 in North Central Kentucky. Her appointment is effective as of Monday.

  • News briefs Jan. 2

    Appointment

    Gov. Steve Beshear has appointed the following members to the Kentucky Board of Certification of Fee-Base Pastoral Counselors:

    John Lepper, of Crestwood, is a pastoral counselor and head of a nonprofit at St. Matthews Pastoral Counseling Center and Kentucky Baptist Fellowship. He represents pastoral counselors. The appointment replaces Wade Rowatt, whose term has expired. Lepper shall serve for a term expiring Sept. 22, 2016.

    Extension office classes

  • Baptist Health La Grange adds new therapy device for pediatric patients

    For the past 60 years, WHAS Crusade for Children has been one of our community’s leading advocates for pediatric special needs, donating 100 percent of all funds it collects to organizations that support children with special needs. This year, the Crusade, in collaboration with the Baptist Health Foundation, donated $75,252 for specialized equipment for Baptist Health. This is just the latest in a series of generous donations WHAS Crusade for Children has made to the Foundation, which total nearly $250,000 since 2011.

  • Locals discover interest in Keno

    The Kentucky Lottery’s latest game is adding extra incentive to stay in Oldham County when dining out.

    The lottery introduced a new Keno game months ago, hoping to boost revenues for the lottery, which supports education funding.

    So far, three Oldham County restaurants have installed Keno: Steve-O’s Italian Restaurant, Beef O’Brady’s and XRailsX.

    Steve Tingle, owner of Steve-O’s said he signed up for the game after being approached by lottery officials.

  • Farm to table twist

    A simple haircut led to the fulfillment of a dream for a local entrepreneur.

    While in the barber’s chair at Dorothy’s Barber Shop, Lonnie Young’s interest was piqued when he learned Starvin’ Marvin’s in Buckner had closed. Young immediately inquired about the space and began plans to fulfill his dream of opening a family-centered restaurant.

    Rooster Creek opened 36 days after the family signed the lease on the property. A complete renovation, new menu and a focus on happiness paved the way for the business to open on Nov. 6.

  • McDonald’s owner makes an impact

    By Stephanie Doyle

    Landmark news service

    George Saliba was 21 and spoke no English when he stepped onto a college campus in Ohio on May 29, 1979 – just three months away from the first day of classes.