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Today's Features

  • If God is good why is there so much evil? This is the question of theodicy that can never be fully answered. This is one of the most difficult questions in all of theology. God is eternal, infinite, omniscient, omnipresent and omnipotent and the creator of the universe. So why is there so much pain, death, struggle and evil in the world? Over the next four weeks I want to look at different facets of the problem of evil: 1) demonic evil, 2) human evil, 3) evil from the perspective of eternity and 4) trusting in the goodness of God.

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    Owners of a 15-month-old, 180-pound Vietnamese Pot-bellied pig from La Grange are trying their best to get their pet to the land of blockbuster motion pictures, red carpets and shining stars with the help of their local community.

    Oink, Oink, the mini pot-bellied pig who is far from being small, was brought to owner Mo Thomas of La Grange, when the animal was five months old and several months later he’s become part of the family.

    “He minds better than the kids,” Thomas said.

  • Does God still use natural disasters to punish people for disobedience and evil? Pat Robertson of the 700 Club apparently believes God does. Just following the earthquake in Haiti he said, “Something happened a long time ago in Haiti and people might not want to talk about it. They were under the heel of the French. They got together and swore a pact to the devil…But ever since, they have been cursed by one thing after the other.”

  • Bill Fischer proudly holds the 2.78-pound tomato he and his wife, Holly, grew in their West Hwy 146 garden.

  • A vacuum salesman was making his first call in rural Tennessee. He had his vacuum cleaner and excitedly knocked on the first door. A kind-looking lady answered the door and he said, “I’ve got the most exciting vacuum cleaner you have ever seen. It will clean your house from top to bottom. You only have to pay so much down.”

    The lady acted interested so he said, “You see that big pile of dirt right there on the floor with all those fur balls and bugs and things. This vacuum cleaner will pick it all up or I’ll eat it.”

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    At just nine years old, Oldham County resident Hayley Fiegle is a national champion.

    Fiegle placed first out of 70 people in the 2013 United States Trampoline and Tumbling Association National Championship in both the Novice Trampoline division and Novice Double-Mini Trampoline division.

    “It’s great to be in the Top 10, and here she comes with two national first place trophies,” Coach Nick Young said. “She was on cloud nine.”

  • Roughly 50 years to the day, 14 women in their 20s gathered in La Grange with a similar goal in mind, one focused on improving their community by tackling smaller, but necessary, projects.

    Little did they know that decades later, that first official meeting of Project Guild would lead to numerous fundraising events, a day-long festival or even a parade where they will be honored as grand marshals this year.

  • One of Oldham County’s oldest services is celebrating its 100th birthday this year with a float in the annual Oldham County Day Parade.

    The Oldham County Extension Office was first opened by John T. Taylor in 1914 and has grown from a rural agriculture outreach service to one available to any resident of the county, extension agent Traci Missun said.

    “We’re open for anybody,” Missun said. “We have a diverse client base. Our mission is to serve people and be a non-biased point of information for people.”

  • Pastor Bob Russell writes in his book Jesus, Lord of Your Personality, that having a lot doesn’t tend to produce a grateful spirit.

  • Seeing a train in downtown La Grange isn’t unusual, but having one with a fresh coat of paint was until recently.

    Thanks to more than two dozen youth from La Grange Baptist Church, the train located outside of the La Grange Railroad Museum looks as good as new after a month of work.