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Today's Features

  • Jonah is a prophet of God, and he wants to do what God wants him to do or say. Then God does the unthinkable: He asks him to do the wrong thing.

    Has that ever happened to you? You go to God willing to do anything, anytime, anywhere, and then God whispers your name deep in your soul, and tells you His will, and you don’t like what you’ve heard?

    That is what happened to Jonah, and he ran in the opposite direction. He heads for Tarshish 2,000 because he didn’t want to save the Ninevites.

  • Elliot’s wife asked him to leave their home. He had spent most of his life on drugs and alcohol. His life was crashing down around him; with nowhere to stay, he checked into a hotel on Christmas Eve.

    He was contemplating suicide when he noticed a Gideon’s Bible on top of the TV.

    “Who needs that,” he said to himself as he smacked it off the TV and onto the floor.

  • By Wesley Robinson
    News intern, The Oldham Era

  • A man dies and meets St. Peter at the pearly gates.

    St. Peter says, “You need 100 points to make it into heaven. You tell me all the good things you’ve done, and I give you a certain number of points for each item, depending on how good it was. When you reach 100 points, you get in.”

    The man says, “I was married to the same woman for 50 years and never cheated on her, even in my heart.”

    St. Peter gives him three points.

  • When Logan Parker chose to study cystic fibrosis for a class science project, he knew very little about the disease.

    Through his studies, the eighth-grader learned about the genetic disorder that primarily affects the lungs. The disease causes thick, bacteria-laden mucus to form and makes breathing incredibly difficult.

    Parker learned even more about cystic fibrosis when a beloved Oldham County Middle School science teacher succumbed to the disease last month.

  • The classroom is alive with activity as a handful of eighth-graders puts the finishing touches on decorations for an end-of-the-school-year field day.

    Like so many before them, the students will soon make the inevitable leap from middle school upperclassman to high school newbies.

    Joe Percefull has observed this rite of passage many times in his 16 years as a teacher at Oldham County Middle School.

  • Rick and Karen Albers celebrated with the rest of Card Nation when the U of L men’s basketball team cut down the nets in Atlanta last month.

    Little did they know, the Goshen couple would have their own small part to play in the Cardinals’ championship celebration.

    More than 270,000 people lined the streets of downtown Louisville May 2 to get a glimpse of the Pegasus Parade’s grand marshals, the U of L men’s and women’s basketball teams.

  • Crestwood’s newest residents got a first look at their new home Friday.

    James and Amanda Calton did what any new homeowners do: opened the kitchen cabinets, envisioned where furniture would go, disagreed over who would get more closet space.

    They also thanked Amanda Shaunessy over and over.

    Shaunessy is a housing case worker with Homes on the Homefront, a program organized by Operation Homefront, a national nonprofit that serves veterans and military families.

    Homes on the Homefront works with banks that donate foreclosed homes.

  • Waltraud “Waldi” Anna Gault became a U.S. citizen in 1970 in Chicago.

    “I am born of German descent in a place very few people have ever heard of, in the town of Eger in the Sudetenland, in Bohemia. Today, the town is called Cheb and in the Czech Republic.”

    Eger was one of the oldest and most prosperous cities. It is first mentioned in 1061 when it was founded by Celtic tribes.

  • The American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life will return to Oldham County this spring.

    The fundraising event will be held 7 p.m.-7 a.m., May 10-11, at the Oldham County High School football field. It is the 12th year for the event here.