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Today's Features

  • As a collegiate and religion major in the 1970’s I encountered a book that had many people wondering about the future. “The Late Great Planet Earth” by Hal Lindsey took a speculative look at a variety of historical events and tried to blend sections of scripture that are difficult to understand with those events to come up with an approximate date of when the end history as we know it on earth would occur. This is known as the eschaton and the study of the end of time is known as eschatology.

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    Prospect area “stars” are busy putting the finishing touches on their ballroom dance routines as part of a fundraising effort for six local charities and the Prospect Area Chamber of Commerce.

    On Feb. 9 at the Mellwood Arts Center in Louisville each star will perform their routines choreographed and perfected by professionals from Derby City Ballroom over the course of 12 weeks. During that time, each star is raising money for an area charity. Dancing With the Prospect Stars involves the following individuals and charities:

  • Most of us have had the experience of working with clay. The lump of clay feels good in our hands as we work it and make it soft. Then we make it into something of our own creation. It probably isn’t very good by worldly standards, but we were probably impressed with what we made because we made it.

    One thing I can guarantee you is that the clay never told us what it wanted us to make it into.

    Jeremiah is inspired by God to use the powerful image of God as the potter and you and I as clay.

  • The Roederer Correctional Complex would like to recognize the following employees for Employee and Supervisor of the Quarter January - March 2014: Lt. Patrick Hawkins, Supervisor of the Quarter, and Jack Barton, Education Coordinator, Employee of the Quarter.

    Lieutenant Patrick Hawkins is the Roederer Correctional Complex (RCC) Unit 2 Supervisor on the 2nd shift.

    Mr. Barton is responsible for TABE testing all A/C inmates at Roederer Correctional Complex (RCC) and Kentucky Correctional Institution for Women. Congratulations on well-deserved awards.

  • Jessica Bush rang in the new year with an unexpectedly early bundle of joy.

    Thomas Eugene Howard was born at 2 p.m. on Jan. 1 to Bush and Tommy Howard of Carrollton. Thomas was the first baby born in 2014 at Baptist Health La Grange. The healthy 7 pound, 8 ounce baby boy was 14 days early and measured 20 inches.

    “I’m pretty excited,” Bush said. “I’m a little nervous about having a boy.”

  • New Year’s is celebrated in America in different ways, usually with lots of friends, parties, confetti, party horns and staying up late to ring in the New Year. Visit the Oldham County History Center’s Peyton Samuel Head Museum and explore some New Year traditions celebrated around the world.

    This exhibit is geared toward children in a year-long effort to educate them about different cultures and the county in which they live.

  • Hear ye, hear ye. Be it known that “the 22nd day of January hereafter be observed as David Wark Griffith Day.”

    And so it has been since Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1975, in Oldham County when Judge Wendell Moore signed into affect a proclamation designating David Wark Griffith Day.

  • I want to have some fun and use math to discover just how much God loves us. Athletes like to talk in percentages about how much they give to help their team win. They talk about giving more than 100 percent, but is that even possible since 100 percent is as much as we can give? Does the same apply in everyday life?

    To help make my point I want to give every letter of the alphabet a point value with “A” getting one point and “Z” getting 26 points and the rest correspond to their place in the alphabet. What equals 100 percent in life?