.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Crestwood man charged for counterfeit cash

-A A +A
By The Staff

What started as a drug investigation Jan. 5 ended up as a case of counterfeit money spreading through one Kentucky community.

Kevin Michael Sheehan, 27, of Crestwood, was arrested by the Bullitt County Drug Task Force, which initiated the investigation.

Sheehan is now housed in the Bullitt County Detention Center on a $25,000 cash bond.

He is charged with 28 counts of criminal possession of a forged instrument, tampering with physical evidence, fleeing or evading police and conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance.

Kenny Hardin, director of the Bullitt County Drug Task Force, said his agency began an investigation in early December on a pharmaceutical fraud ring. It was determined that some of the dealers were also involved with counterfeit money, according to Hardin.

A deal was set up and Sheehan wanted a handgun, a rifle and oxycotin in exchange for $2,000.

When the deal was made, Sheehan only had $660 and officers identified themselves as police, which led to a short foot pursuit. The money turned out to be counterfeit.

Hardin said the case was given to Sheriff’s Det. Mike Cook, who handled the counterfeit money.

Cook interviewed Sheehan and it was discovered that the money was being produced in Jefferson County.

The U.S. Secret Service became involved and received a search warrant for a property in Jefferson County. At that location, equipment used in the manufacturing of counterfeit money was found, according to Cook, who didn’t know if any charges had been filed in that portion of the case.

Cook said there may be as many as 33 counts due to the number of fake $20 bills recovered. When Sheehan was trying to elude police, Hardin said some of the money was torn up and thrown away.

Throughout the interview, Cook said Sheehan was cooperative in helping to lead federal agents to the property in Louisville.

The copies were very authentic and Cook encouraged any business owner who thinks they may have received one of the fake bills to contact police.

Hardin said it is important to get them out of circulation.